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Orange County Central Women’s Jail Inmate Search

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Can Inmates in the Hole Still Have Visits?

Inmates end up in solitary confinement for three reasons: punishment, administrative segregation and safety. The reason the inmate was placed in the hole has a significant bearing on whether or not he can have visits. Each jail sets its own rules but the general guidelines include: Punishment: Many jails prohibit inmates in solitary confinement from

An Inmate Must Communicate With the Jail Nurses for Good Care

Due to HIPPA laws, most nurses will refuse to discuss your inmate's medical condition with you unless the inmate provides prior written permission. It will be up to the inmate to work the system from inside. These steps will guide both the inmate and his family on the best way to get medical care while […]

Getting a Felon's Voting Rights Restored in Hawaii

Voting is one of the most fundamental rights given to American citizens, however, once you've been convicted of a felony, whether or not that right will be restored to you is up to the state that you reside in. The laws for Hawaii include: If You Have Been Charged In Hawaii you maintain your right […]

Sentenced to 25 Years to Life: What Does it Mean?

A sentence of 25 to life is very open-ended and frequently, it's not in the offender's favor. If your boyfriend is facing a 25 to life sentence, the bad news is he could potentially spend the rest of his life in prison. The good news is that after 25 years he will be eligible to […]

Inmate Voting Rights: Can I Vote After Being Convicted of a Misdemeanor Offense?

In most states, once you are released from jail for your misdemeanor conviction your voting rights are fully restored. In some cases, you are still allowed to vote even while incarcerated. In the states of Idaho, Kentucky, Indiana, South Carolina, Michigan, South Dakota and Missouri, if you are in jail or prison due to a […]

4 Things to Avoid During An Arrest

Only an attorney should advise you of your individual arrest situation but in general, these four suggestions may help stabilize your situation. Don't try and argue your way out. In most cases, by the time the cuffs come out, there is no turning back. Arguing, negotiating, and continuing to try to avoid arrest will do […]

Bio-chemical treatment for Alcohol Addiction

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Consequences of Providing Contraband to an Inmate

It is never a good idea to mail contraband to an inmate or to bring it on a visit. The consequences for such actions are serious not only for the inmate, but also for you. What is Contraband? Contraband is anything that inmates are not allowed to have in their possession. Obvious examples are weapons, […]

Can a Felon Possess a Gun In Colorado?

Colorado law allows certain convicted felons to own or possess guns. Federal law still makes it a crime to do so, and in some cases the feds have pursued prosecution of those who possess guns in states that allow it. Only an attorney should advise you on this matter but the basics of Colorado's laws […]

Posting Bail Gets Him Out of Jail, But What About When There Are Holds?

People who are arrested and charged with crimes are usually taken to the county jail. At the jail or very soon afterwards during a bond hearing, a bond is set. If someone pays the bond, the defendant gets out of jail to await his hearing unless one of the following occurs: Probation Violation Hold News […]

Can a Felon Possess a Gun In California?

California law allows some convicted felons to own or possess guns. Federal law still makes it a crime to do so, and in some cases the feds have pursued prosecution of those who possess guns in states that permit it. Only an attorney should advise you on this matter, but the basics of California laws […]

Are Penalties Stiffer For Selling Drugs in a Drug-Free School Zone?

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Inmate Criminal Charges: Can Inmates get Charged With Crimes in Jail?

In the movies, inmates commit crimes and nothing ever happens to them. In real life, committing a crime in jail will usually get the inmate a new criminal charge. Here is how it works. How will they establish what happened? The jail will investigate any suspected crime, just as if it happened on the outside. […]

5 Facts About Your Supplemental Security Income Payments While You Are Incarcerated

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Inmate Visitation Suggestions

You have to schedule inmate visits into all of the other things going on in your life. To an inmate, your visit is the highlight of his week. You know that, but you also have a lot going on in your life. Make sure your time is well spent by reviewing these guidelines. Always be […]

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Choosing Which Days to Visit An Inmate

Visitation looks simple on the surface, but keep in mind these details when planning to see your inmate: Commissary: For most inmates, the week revolves around visits and commissary deliveries. If possible plan your visits for the days that commissary is not delivered. This gives the inmate different pleasures throughout the week instead of having […]

4 Things to Avoid During An Arrest

Only an attorney should advise you of your individual arrest situation but in general, these four suggestions may help stabilize your situation. Don't try and argue your way out. In most cases, by the time the cuffs come out, there is no turning back. Arguing, negotiating, and continuing to try to avoid arrest will do […]

Protective Custody in Prison: The Pros and Cons

Protective Custody can be a double-edged sword. It is a method for protecting an inmate from physical harm, but one the inmate is in PC (Protective custody), word spreads quickly and when the inmate is later placed back in general population, lots of people might have a problem. It is important to weigh the pros […]

What Happens When an Illegal Immigrant Commits a Crime?

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What are the Penalties for Probation Violations?

A probation violation conviction can mean being sent to jail or prison, but there are alternative penalties that can be used instead, including: Revocation and reinstatement: The judge and the probation officer can agree to revoke your probation for the violation and immediately reinstate you on new probation. Increased supervision: Your probation rules

Inmate Phone Calls: Are They Listening in and Recording?

To an inmate, the phone is a lifeline to the outside world. Some inmates dial memorized numbers all day long, hoping that someone will pick up. It is important to remember that every phone call between an inmate and an outside number is recorded, and callers should act accordingly. Avoid anything incriminating. Staff members can […]

Can I Buy Personal Hygiene Products and Bring Them to the Inmate?

The county jails provide the most basic personal hygiene products to inmates and they are not high quality items. Many jails have limits on how many products each inmate can receive each week, and it isn't always enough. For this reason, loved ones are often eager to bring hygiene items to their inmates. Check out: […]

Jail Good Time Credits and How they Work

You might hear the term "good time credit" tossed around in conversations with your inmate. Good time credits are units of time given to an inmate that take time off his or her sentence. Each jail decides how good time credits will be used, but here are some general guidelines. Counting credits: Jails typically decide […]

Should Children Visit Parents in Jails and Prisons?

Children think in very literal terms. Rules are to be obeyed and if you don't obey them you are being bad. When a parent goes to jail, the child not only has to accept the fact that the parent made a really bad choice, but they also have to comprehend that the parent has been […]

Deciding How Much Money to Put on the Books

What does the inmate need? Contact the jail and ask what basics are supplied. Most jails give the inmates toothpaste, toothbrushes, shampoo, soap and toilet paper. Ask them what happens if the inmate runs out of something. is it replaced right away or do they have to wait a week or longer for new supplies […]

4 Good Places to Find Prison Pen Pals

Learn About Them Through friends. If you know someone who is incarcerated or has a family member incarcerated, ask for the name of an inmate who might like having a pen pal. This is an excellent way to meet pen pals because they can give a personal recommendation. Use Pen Pal Sites. There are several […]

Can a Felon Possess a Gun In California?

California law allows some convicted felons to own or possess guns. Federal law still makes it a crime to do so, and in some cases the feds have pursued prosecution of those who possess guns in states that permit it. Only an attorney should advise you on this matter, but the basics of California laws […]

An Inmate Can Meditate to Alleviate Fears in Prison

If someone you know is in prison, you can be sure there is stress involved in that inmate's daily life. Prisons are loud, can be dangerous and there is very little freedom. In addition, simply being sentenced to do time disrupts life with regard to employment, family and other outside obligations. By the time the […]

Voting Rights for Felons in Alabama

The state of Alabama allows felons to have their voting rights restored under the following guidelines. You must have completed your entire sentence, including incarceration, probation, and parole, or community supervision. Once completed, you have three options: Contact your local parole or probation office Write to the Board of Pardons and Parole

Inmate Voting Rights: Can I Vote After Being Convicted of a Misdemeanor Offense?

In most states, once you are released from jail for your misdemeanor conviction your voting rights are fully restored. In some cases, you are still allowed to vote even while incarcerated. In the states of Idaho, Kentucky, Indiana, South Carolina, Michigan, South Dakota and Missouri, if you are in jail or prison due to a […]

Hundreds more 'Straight Up Answers'...

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Visiting an Inmate in the Orange County Central Women's Jail in California

If you've never visited a jail before, you might not be so sure about what is required. This is a brief summary of a few things to help get you ready to visit your inmate. Remember, it is important that families and inmates maintain contact, if possible, so don't be fearful. There are rules to protect you, the inmates, and the staff of the Orange County Central Women's Jail.

Generally there are dress codes when it comes to visiting a jail. You should wear traditional clothing. Though a specific code is not listed here there are some general guidelines that fit most incarceration facilities. You should inquire directly with the Orange County Central Women's Jail to verify any specifics beyond what is listed here.

  • Do not wear clothing with pictures, words, graffiti etc. Plain clothes are best
  • Do not wear hoodies, shear or provocative clothing. Clothing that shows cleavage or a lot of back or skin of any kind.
  • Do not wear short dresses or skirts or short shorts.
  • Generally clothing with holes, tears, rips are not to be worn.

As stated these are just some basic guidelines. If you remember for all visitors (including children) to wear nice clean, plain clothing with shoes, you should be fine.
The Address for Orange County Central Women's Jail is:

550 N. Flower St.
Santa Ana, CA 92703

Visitation is allowed on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday from 8 am – 6 pm. Visitors must sign-up when coming to visit.

Here are some simple basic rules of visitation.

  • No one can sign up to visit after 5 pm
  • One visit per visit day
  • Families should talk and coordinate visiting times so no one is refused entry
  • Visits proceed in order of arrival
  • 2 people and one child under 5 can visit at a time
  • Visitors must have a government issue ID such as a state ID card, driver's license, military ID, passport, etc.

We hope you enjoy your visit at Orange County Central Women's Jail and are able to find this information helpful. If you have any questions that have not been addressed, please call the jail and they will be happy to answer any questions you may have.

Visitation is an important time for you and your inmate. Enjoy your time and remember all the rules and regulations are in place for your safety as well as theirs.

RELATED: Orange County Central Women’s Jail Inmate Search

RELATED: Orange County Central Women’s Jail Inmate Services


writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.

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How to use the Inmate Search for Orange County Central Women's Jail in California

When you are trying to search for an inmate it can be difficult. We are here to try and make that task a little easier for you. Whether you are searching for a county inmate or a State of California or Federal prisoner there are links in the top left corner of this page where you can go to look for them.

http://www.jailexchange.com/CountyJails/California/Orange/Orange_County_Central_Womens_Jail_Inmate_Search.aspx

Here we will concentrate on the Orange County Central Jail Women's Jail search by list, search, mobile inmate, recent arrests, and recent releases.

When using the links listed below you must have at least a last name to begin your search. If you include first and middle names, age, and gender your list will be smaller. Once you input your information click SEARCH and a list will populate that matches your entered information.

  • Orange County Jail Inmate List  
  • Orange County Jail Inmate Search   
  • County Inmates – mobile  
  • Orange County Recent Releases - When searching for someone recently released you also have to put in their last name but the list only goes back for the last 30 days.

[Article_Ad_2]If you are looking for someone who has been recently arrested you can go to the link below. It will open up to a date field. Pick the date of the arrest and a list of inmates arrested that day will appear.

You will also see a link for VINELINK, a national information source for crime victims, to get information on offenders. This link gives you VINELINK support numbers for Orange County.

If you need to post bail / bond for an inmate in Orange County Central Jail Women's Jail

There are specific ways you can do this. Bail can be by cash or by bond depending on what is required for your inmate.

You can pay cash bails with several methods:

  • Credit card
  • Debit cared
  • Personal check
  • Traveler's check
  • Cashier's check
  • NO business or corporate checks
  • Money orders

The company EZ Card and Kiosk Company helps make paying easier. You can go online to pay BAIL BONDS at the link Bail / Bond info - extra. If you want to pay online you can just click on this link and go through the steps. They are pretty easy to follow.

First click on the button that says Main menu, then pick California, then pick Orange County, select your language, select Bail, read the information page and click on Agree. You will then have to enter the booking number and last name of the inmate. Follow the rest of the prompts from there and you'll be done in no time.

If you would prefer to use a Kiosk (kind of like an ATM), these take cash, debit cards, and credit cards. They are open 24 hours a day at the Intake Release Center and the Theo Lacy Branch Jail. You can also call EZ Card and Kiosk Company at 888-497-2387 if you want to make a payment by telephone.

If you want to pay a bail bond in person you can do that at either IRC or Theo Lacy, but only during Theo Lacy cashier business hours. IRC takes bond payments 24 hours/day 7 days/week.

If you are preparing to pay a bond, first call Inmate Records at (714) 647-4666. They will help you to verify:

  • The inmate is fully processed, booked, and has been sentenced. If not, bail cannot be posted.
  • The amount of money you need to have for the bail/bond
  • The type of payment method you must use to pay bond for the particular inmate.

Please also remember these two very important rules when paying bail / bonds.

  • All persons paying bonds (except agents) are fingerprinted. You identify will also be verified.
  • Staff and officers in the department are not allowed to advice you on a bond agency or bail company.

RELATED: Orange County Central Women’s Jail Inmate Search

RELATED: Orange County Central Women’s Jail Inmate Services


writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.

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Communicating with an Inmate Housed at the Orange County Central Women's Jail in California

The easiest ways to have contact with an inmate in Orange County Central Women's Jail is through visitation and mail. Email and phone contact are not options at this time.

Visitation is covered on a separate page so we will address the option of mail here. Though it's not actually a form of contact, you can send money to your inmate in several ways. We will talk about that later in the information.

Mail Rules for Inmates

Mail is highly regulated coming into and out of our facility. This helps to ensure the safety of all inmates, staff members, and visitors. Contact with your inmate via mail can be a great way to touch base and keep up with one another. It also helps the inmate's spirits and overall demeanor. Therefore, mail is important to them as well as you. Please follow the rules closely so that no mail privileges are suspended.

When filling out any mail coming to the Orange County Central Women's Jail the inmate's booking number and full name must appear in the address. On your return address in the top left corner of the envelope you should put your full name and return address.

Specific Mail Rules:

  • Inmates can purchase mailing products: stamped envelopes, etc. from the U.S. Postal Service or the commissary at the jail (Do not mail in these types of items.)
  • Hard back books are not allowed
  • Inmates can have no more than 5 books or magazines combined
  • Soft cover books must be new (no used, no leather) and must come directly from an approved distributor like Amazon.com or Barnes and Noble or publisher. There is a list you can select from. Magazines and newspapers have to come from the approved list or the publisher directly also.
  • Never mail over 10 pictures or pages of photocopied materials.
  • Never spray anything on a letter or envelope.
  • No writing or drawing on envelope.
  • No pictures containing nudity, vulgarity, obscenity, or any type of provocation
  • No boxes can be sent without approval.
  • Don't send any package bigger than a 9"x12" manila envelope.
  • You can send money orders but they must be written out to the Orange County Sheriff's Department with the inmate's booking number and full name on the reference line at the bottom. (You can also get money to them via the information below about EZ Card and Kiosk.)
  • Government checks made out to the inmate are also allowed.
  • You can email a pair of eyeglasses. One pair of prescription or reading glasses without metal or fancy, embellished frames are acceptable. Do not send eyeglass cases.
  •  Inmates can have up to 2 boxes of contacts. They cannot have solution or cases mailed. These have to be purchased in the commissary.

Here is a List of Contraband / Don't Send No No's

Though this list does not include everything, it will give you a basic idea of what not to send. Essentially the best thing to do is to mail plain written letters in plan written envelopes already stamped from the post office. Glasses as noted above are okay. If you need to send other things, ask the jail how to get it to the inmate and if it is allowed, they will explain the appropriate process.

  • Don't send any food or drinks
  • Don't send any clothing or hygiene products
  • No certificates or any kind of license
  • No plastic cards like debit or credit
  • No checkbooks
  • No third party/forwarded letters
  • No threatening items or security risk items
  • Nothing that can't be inspected easily: no sticky, gluey substance, lipsticks, smells sprayed on, discolorations, no layered articles, no laminated or otherwise sealed items that cannot be inspected.
  • No type of substances can be mailed, sprayed on, smeared on, etc. – glue, lip gloss, lip stick, no type of unusual smell to paper, no type of multi-layered items like cards that can't be inspected easily.
  • No laminated or heat sealed otherwise items.

Here is the EZ Card and Kiosk information so you can get money to your inmate for commissary use. They can't have more than $500 at a time.

You can click here http://www.ezmoneypayments.com/ to add money by:

  • Debit card
  • Credit card

You can go to one of the kiosks to pay by cash, debit or credit card. They are located in the IRC and the Theo Lacy Branch. Kiosks are always open.

You can pay a small fee and pay over the phone at 888-497-2387.

RELATED: Orange County Central Women’s Jail Inmate Search

RELATED: Orange County Central Women’s Jail Inmate Services


writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.

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