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+Straight Up Answers

What is an Inmate Money or Commissary Account?

Most jails and prisons in America allow friends and family members of inmates to make deposits to inmate money accounts. They are set up to give the inmate access to various services including commissary purchases and phone use. Some facilities deduct nominal amounts from these accounts for inmate health visits and other jail fees. Commissary […]

Drastically Reduce the Cost of Calls from Your Out of State Inmate

Most facilities contract with a third-party company so you can fund prepaid calls, but if those calls are long distance, it can become cost-prohibitive. Luckily there is a way to pay local call rates for long-distance calls on a prepaid service. First, Do Some Very Basic Research Find out the area code for the jail […]

Get a Special Visit If You Live Far From the Jail

The logistics of visiting an inmate who is incarcerated very far from where you live can be tricky. If the jail has very short visits or requires a specific visitation registration processes, it makes it even more difficult. Some jails make exceptions for those who must travel to visit the inmate. How Far is Far? […]

Parental Visitation: Know the keys to Helping Your Child Visit Their Parent in Jail

Children typically desire contact with their parents, even if a parent is incarcerated, so learn the ropes to keep the connection going: Keep it Simple Depending on the age of the child, you can explain without going into too much detail, why the parent is in jail. Preschool to elementary kids – Let them know […]

How Does a Bail Bond Process Work?

Many states allow defendants to be released from jail to wait for court by paying a percentage of the total bond amount. Percentages range from 10 to 20 percent depending on state law. Understand how the process works to help someone who's been arrested. What is a Bond? A bond is an amount of money […]

Can I Visit an Inmate if I am on Probation or Parole?

A friend or family member has been arrested and this has created chaos and stress. Before you race off to visit him or her in jail, if you are on probation or parole you need to take the following steps. Find out the Rules Some jails will not allow anyone on probation or parole to […]

What Does a 15 Years to Life Sentence Mean?

A sentence of 15 years to life, 25 years to life or similar sounding words all mean the same thing. The only difference is the time frame. What the Number Means The number in the sentence indicates the minimum number of years the inmate must serve before he or she can be considered for parole. […]

Consequences of Providing Contraband to an Inmate

It is never a good idea to mail contraband to an inmate or to bring it on a visit. The consequences for such actions are serious not only for the inmate, but also for you. What is Contraband? Contraband is anything that inmates are not allowed to have in their possession. Obvious examples are weapons, […]

Voting Rights for Felons in Alabama

The state of Alabama allows felons to have their voting rights restored under the following guidelines. You must have completed your entire sentence, including incarceration, probation, and parole, or community supervision. Once completed, you have three options: Contact your local parole or probation office Write to the Board of Pardons and Parole

Maine Marijuana Laws: Decriminalized but Still Tricky

Decriminalizing Pot doesn't always mean it is completely legal. Here are some current guidelines. Possession Unlike several other states that chose an ounce as the cutoff for a civil penalty, Maine allows you to possess up to 2.5 ounces and still receive a civil ticket. The fine is a flat $600 regardless of the amount. […]

4 Good Places to Find Prison Pen Pals

Learn About Them Through friends. If you know someone who is incarcerated or has a family member incarcerated, ask for the name of an inmate who might like having a pen pal. This is an excellent way to meet pen pals because they can give a personal recommendation. Use Pen Pal Sites. There are several […]

Can a Felon Possess a Gun In Georgia?

Georgia law is very clear on its position regarding convicted felons in that state owning or possessing firearms: It follows the federal law when it comes to guns and felons. The Basics: With the exception of a felony conviction that is non-violent and related exclusively to a business-related crime, if you have ever been convicted […]

Getting a Felon's Voting Rights Restored in Massachusetts

Voting is one of the most fundamental rights given to American citizens, but that right can be lost if you're a convicted felon. It's up to the each state to decide their laws about restoring rights. The laws for Massachusetts include: If You're Charged If you've been charged with a crime, but have not yet […]

Massachusetts Marijuana Laws

Decriminalizing Marijuana doesn't always mean it is completely legal. In some cases, such as in Massachusetts, possession of less than an ounce is no longer a crime but is now a civil offense. Possession It is a civil offense to possess one ounce or less of Marijuana. If found guilty the fine is $100. In […]

Can a Felon Own a Gun In New Mexico?

Generally speaking, federal law makes it a crime for a convicted felon to own or possess a gun or ammunition. If you were convicted of a federal felony crime, you must receive a presidential pardon if you are to ever own a firearm again. Some states, however, have specifically designed laws regarding felons convicted of […]

Hundreds more 'Straight Up Answers'...

 

What is an Inmate Money or Commissary Account?

Most jails and prisons in America allow friends and family members of inmates to make deposits to inmate money accounts. They are set up to give the inmate access to various services including commissary purchases and phone use. Some facilities deduct nominal amounts from these accounts for inmate health visits and other jail fees. Commissary […]

Drastically Reduce the Cost of Calls from Your Out of State Inmate

Most facilities contract with a third-party company so you can fund prepaid calls, but if those calls are long distance, it can become cost-prohibitive. Luckily there is a way to pay local call rates for long-distance calls on a prepaid service. First, Do Some Very Basic Research Find out the area code for the jail […]

Get a Special Visit If You Live Far From the Jail

The logistics of visiting an inmate who is incarcerated very far from where you live can be tricky. If the jail has very short visits or requires a specific visitation registration processes, it makes it even more difficult. Some jails make exceptions for those who must travel to visit the inmate. How Far is Far? […]

Parental Visitation: Know the keys to Helping Your Child Visit Their Parent in Jail

Children typically desire contact with their parents, even if a parent is incarcerated, so learn the ropes to keep the connection going: Keep it Simple Depending on the age of the child, you can explain without going into too much detail, why the parent is in jail. Preschool to elementary kids – Let them know […]

How Does a Bail Bond Process Work?

Many states allow defendants to be released from jail to wait for court by paying a percentage of the total bond amount. Percentages range from 10 to 20 percent depending on state law. Understand how the process works to help someone who's been arrested. What is a Bond? A bond is an amount of money […]

Can I Visit an Inmate if I am on Probation or Parole?

A friend or family member has been arrested and this has created chaos and stress. Before you race off to visit him or her in jail, if you are on probation or parole you need to take the following steps. Find out the Rules Some jails will not allow anyone on probation or parole to […]

What Does a 15 Years to Life Sentence Mean?

A sentence of 15 years to life, 25 years to life or similar sounding words all mean the same thing. The only difference is the time frame. What the Number Means The number in the sentence indicates the minimum number of years the inmate must serve before he or she can be considered for parole. […]

Consequences of Providing Contraband to an Inmate

It is never a good idea to mail contraband to an inmate or to bring it on a visit. The consequences for such actions are serious not only for the inmate, but also for you. What is Contraband? Contraband is anything that inmates are not allowed to have in their possession. Obvious examples are weapons, […]

Voting Rights for Felons in Alabama

The state of Alabama allows felons to have their voting rights restored under the following guidelines. You must have completed your entire sentence, including incarceration, probation, and parole, or community supervision. Once completed, you have three options: Contact your local parole or probation office Write to the Board of Pardons and Parole

Maine Marijuana Laws: Decriminalized but Still Tricky

Decriminalizing Pot doesn't always mean it is completely legal. Here are some current guidelines. Possession Unlike several other states that chose an ounce as the cutoff for a civil penalty, Maine allows you to possess up to 2.5 ounces and still receive a civil ticket. The fine is a flat $600 regardless of the amount. […]

4 Good Places to Find Prison Pen Pals

Learn About Them Through friends. If you know someone who is incarcerated or has a family member incarcerated, ask for the name of an inmate who might like having a pen pal. This is an excellent way to meet pen pals because they can give a personal recommendation. Use Pen Pal Sites. There are several […]

Can a Felon Possess a Gun In Georgia?

Georgia law is very clear on its position regarding convicted felons in that state owning or possessing firearms: It follows the federal law when it comes to guns and felons. The Basics: With the exception of a felony conviction that is non-violent and related exclusively to a business-related crime, if you have ever been convicted […]

Getting a Felon's Voting Rights Restored in Massachusetts

Voting is one of the most fundamental rights given to American citizens, but that right can be lost if you're a convicted felon. It's up to the each state to decide their laws about restoring rights. The laws for Massachusetts include: If You're Charged If you've been charged with a crime, but have not yet […]

Massachusetts Marijuana Laws

Decriminalizing Marijuana doesn't always mean it is completely legal. In some cases, such as in Massachusetts, possession of less than an ounce is no longer a crime but is now a civil offense. Possession It is a civil offense to possess one ounce or less of Marijuana. If found guilty the fine is $100. In […]

Can a Felon Own a Gun In New Mexico?

Generally speaking, federal law makes it a crime for a convicted felon to own or possess a gun or ammunition. If you were convicted of a federal felony crime, you must receive a presidential pardon if you are to ever own a firearm again. Some states, however, have specifically designed laws regarding felons convicted of […]

Hundreds more 'Straight Up Answers'...

Visiting an Inmate in the San Diego County Bailey Det Ctr in California

In order to visit an inmate at the Bailey Detention Center, you must make a reservation beforehand. Reservations can be made online or by telephone. If you wish to make a reservation online, you must look up the inmate at the Who's In Jail page at the Sheriff's Department website located at this link (http://apps.sdsheriff.net/wij/wij.aspx). Lookup the inmate of your interest, and there is a link in the inmate's profile to schedule a reservation.

Reservations are taken 24 hours a day online every Tuesday through Sunday, as the website is unavailable on Mondays. Reservations made by telephone must be made every Tuesday through Sunday from 10 AM to 2 PM PST. To make a reservation, call the detention center at (760) 210-0386. Same day visit are permitted, depending on an inmate's work schedule, availability, and the status of an inmate's privileges.

Much like every detention facility in San Diego, they have their own visiting schedule based on the jail's housing arrangements. A schedule on when visits can be permitted is located at http://www.sdsheriff.net/detentionfacilities/visit_gbdf.html. There are also many rules on visiting an inmate. The George Bailey Detention Center does not allow contact visits, and visits are through a glass window with a telephone handset provided by the jail. Visits are limited to 30 minutes per session, and an inmate is allowed two social visits a week, and only one a day.

Anyone visiting an inmate must check in at least one hour before the scheduled visit. Only those who made a reservation to visit an inmate can be at the visit. In order to get in, a visitor must have a valid photo ID on them to verify their identity. This includes, but is not limited to, a driver's license, passport, school ID, or a visa. A maximum of three visitors can be present at one time, and all minors must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian.

More rules and guidelines can be viewed at http://www.sdsheriff.net/jailinfo/visiting.html. Visitations are encouraged by the San Diego Sheriff's Department, but they are also a privilege, not a right.

RELATED: San Diego County Jail - Bailey Detention Center Inmate Search

RELATED: San Diego County Jail - Bailey Detention Center Inmate Services


writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.

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How to use the Inmate Search for San Diego County Bailey Det Ctr in California

The George F. Bailey Detention Center is located right near the barren deserts of San Diego. It currently has 1,888 beds, and a revolving door of inmates in for various crimes. It is also the largest detention facility in San Diego. If you have a family member or friend currently locked up in this facility, or if you want to know if they are in any detention facility in San Diego, looking them up is simple, and only requires a few very simple steps.

[Article_Ad_2]First, go to their website at http://www.sdsheriff.net/detentionfacilities/gbdf.html, and go to the "Who's In Jail" link at the far right hand side of the screen. Click on that link, and you will e prompted to enter the first and last name of an inmate. Exact spelling is not required. What is required, however, are the first two letters of an inmate's last name and the first letter of an inmate's first name. For example, if you wanted to look up a woman named Donna Mae, you would have to type in "D" for the first name, and "Ma" for the last name. Or if you want, you can type in the full name. Afterwards, you should click on the Lookup button or the Reset button if you had made a mistake in typing the name, in which case you just type the name in again but correctly.

After you hit the Lookup button, you will be taken to a CAPTCHA screen. CAPTCHA screens are used on many websites to verify that a human is trying to look at the website, and not a computer or a robotic device. This is done to ensure the security of the webpage, so that an inmate's information cannot be used for commercial purposes and that a user cannot be blocked from the webpage. All you have to do on that screen is type in the 5 or 6 green characters in the white box, and then hit Continue. Given you typed in the correct letters, you will be taken to a list of matches. This gives matches for any inmate locked up in any of the San Diego detention facilities, but an inmate's profile will be sure to tell where they are exactly.

An inmate's profile will give you a person's basic vital statistics, such as nationality, date of birth, and other physical characteristics. It also shows where he/she is being held, what they were charged with, and any release or bail information you may need to know. There are also links on the profile page for inmate services, such as emailing the inmate, scheduling a visit with the inmate, and shopping the jail's commissary for goods and services to aid the inmate.

The inmate search module on the Bailey Detention Center website, as well as San Diego County jails as a whole may be a bit vague and intimidating, but it contains enough to know that if you have a loved one currently locked up, they are in the system and they are getting their day in court.

RELATED: San Diego County Jail - Bailey Detention Center Inmate Search

RELATED: San Diego County Jail - Bailey Detention Center Inmate Services


writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.

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Communicating with an Inmate Housed at the San Diego County Bailey Det Ctr in California

Contact with a family member or loved one during a time of incarceration is very much encouraged, as it makes the period of separation a little easier for those involved. There are rules and limitations, but contact is relatively simple. For one, inmates can receive e-mail messages while they're in custody.

There are guidelines on how to successfully e-mail an inmate at the George Bailey Detention Center. First of all, privacy is not guaranteed, so be careful on what you write in an e-mail. You may send up to two e-mail messages a day in lieu of postcards, but the e-mails can only be up to one page long. Attachments, such as photographs, are not allowed in the e-mail. When prompted to give a return address, be sure to give your home address or any other address you want to use in regards to correspondence with an inmate. An inmate will not be able to send an e-mail, and any returning correspondence will be conducted through the U.S. Postal Service.

How do you look up an inmate's e-mail address? An inmate has no e-mail address, per se, but you can look them up online. Their inmate profile contains a link to send them an e-mail. Just be sure to follow any directions that come up.

You can also write to the inmate the old-fashioned way; through mail. You can send inmates a postcard, given they are rectangular, not altered from their original form, and follow the criteria of the correctional facility. Please visit http://www.sdsheriff.net/jailinfo/mail.html for the precise guidelines of sending an inmate snail mail.

When sending mail to an inmate, be sure to use this heading:

Inmate's Name, # Booking Number
George Bailey Detention Facility
446 Alta Rd. Ste. 5300
San Diego, CA 92158-0002

Inmates also have telephone privileges throughout the day once they are booked. Visit http://www.sdsheriff.net/jailinfo/phones.html for more information about telephone privileges and guidelines. The number for the Bailey Detention Facility is (619) 210-0385.

RELATED: San Diego County Jail - Bailey Detention Center Inmate Search

RELATED: San Diego County Jail - Bailey Detention Center Inmate Services


writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.

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