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Kent Regional Justice Center Inmate Search

+Straight Up Answers

Get a Special Visit If You Live Far From the Jail

The logistics of visiting an inmate who is incarcerated very far from where you live can be tricky. If the jail has very short visits or requires a specific visitation registration processes, it makes it even more difficult. Some jails make exceptions for those who must travel to visit the inmate. How Far is Far? […]

Parental Visitation: Know the keys to Helping Your Child Visit Their Parent in Jail

Children typically desire contact with their parents, even if a parent is incarcerated, so learn the ropes to keep the connection going: Keep it Simple Depending on the age of the child, you can explain without going into too much detail, why the parent is in jail. Preschool to elementary kids – Let them know […]

How Does a Bail Bond Process Work?

Many states allow defendants to be released from jail to wait for court by paying a percentage of the total bond amount. Percentages range from 10 to 20 percent depending on state law. Understand how the process works to help someone who's been arrested. What is a Bond? A bond is an amount of money […]

Can I Visit an Inmate if I am on Probation or Parole?

A friend or family member has been arrested and this has created chaos and stress. Before you race off to visit him or her in jail, if you are on probation or parole you need to take the following steps. Find out the Rules Some jails will not allow anyone on probation or parole to […]

What Does a 15 Years to Life Sentence Mean?

A sentence of 15 years to life, 25 years to life or similar sounding words all mean the same thing. The only difference is the time frame. What the Number Means The number in the sentence indicates the minimum number of years the inmate must serve before he or she can be considered for parole. […]

Consequences of Providing Contraband to an Inmate

It is never a good idea to mail contraband to an inmate or to bring it on a visit. The consequences for such actions are serious not only for the inmate, but also for you. What is Contraband? Contraband is anything that inmates are not allowed to have in their possession. Obvious examples are weapons, […]

Voting Rights for Felons in Alabama

The state of Alabama allows felons to have their voting rights restored under the following guidelines. You must have completed your entire sentence, including incarceration, probation, and parole, or community supervision. Once completed, you have three options: Contact your local parole or probation office Write to the Board of Pardons and Parole

Maine Marijuana Laws: Decriminalized but Still Tricky

Decriminalizing Pot doesn't always mean it is completely legal. Here are some current guidelines. Possession Unlike several other states that chose an ounce as the cutoff for a civil penalty, Maine allows you to possess up to 2.5 ounces and still receive a civil ticket. The fine is a flat $600 regardless of the amount. […]

4 Good Places to Find Prison Pen Pals

Learn About Them Through friends. If you know someone who is incarcerated or has a family member incarcerated, ask for the name of an inmate who might like having a pen pal. This is an excellent way to meet pen pals because they can give a personal recommendation. Use Pen Pal Sites. There are several […]

Can a Felon Possess a Gun In Georgia?

Georgia law is very clear on its position regarding convicted felons in that state owning or possessing firearms: It follows the federal law when it comes to guns and felons. The Basics: With the exception of a felony conviction that is non-violent and related exclusively to a business-related crime, if you have ever been convicted […]

Getting a Felon's Voting Rights Restored in Massachusetts

Voting is one of the most fundamental rights given to American citizens, but that right can be lost if you're a convicted felon. It's up to the each state to decide their laws about restoring rights. The laws for Massachusetts include: If You're Charged If you've been charged with a crime, but have not yet […]

Massachusetts Marijuana Laws

Decriminalizing Marijuana doesn't always mean it is completely legal. In some cases, such as in Massachusetts, possession of less than an ounce is no longer a crime but is now a civil offense. Possession It is a civil offense to possess one ounce or less of Marijuana. If found guilty the fine is $100. In […]

Can a Felon Own a Gun In New Mexico?

Generally speaking, federal law makes it a crime for a convicted felon to own or possess a gun or ammunition. If you were convicted of a federal felony crime, you must receive a presidential pardon if you are to ever own a firearm again. Some states, however, have specifically designed laws regarding felons convicted of […]

Why Doesn't An Addict Get Clean After Overdosing?

As told by an addict who overdosed and almost died twice before giving up drugs. How often did you get high before you overdosed? By the time I overdosed the first time, I was getting high on a daily basis. I no longer took drugs to enjoy a high. I took them to avoid being […]

When the Newness of Sobriety Wears Off

Sobriety is like a love relationship. When you start out, everything is exciting and new. When I first got clean, everything I read, saw and heard about sobriety was very attractive to me. I spent my free time getting to know it in the same way I would get to know a new woman. The […]

Hundreds more 'Straight Up Answers'...

 

Get a Special Visit If You Live Far From the Jail

The logistics of visiting an inmate who is incarcerated very far from where you live can be tricky. If the jail has very short visits or requires a specific visitation registration processes, it makes it even more difficult. Some jails make exceptions for those who must travel to visit the inmate. How Far is Far? […]

Parental Visitation: Know the keys to Helping Your Child Visit Their Parent in Jail

Children typically desire contact with their parents, even if a parent is incarcerated, so learn the ropes to keep the connection going: Keep it Simple Depending on the age of the child, you can explain without going into too much detail, why the parent is in jail. Preschool to elementary kids – Let them know […]

How Does a Bail Bond Process Work?

Many states allow defendants to be released from jail to wait for court by paying a percentage of the total bond amount. Percentages range from 10 to 20 percent depending on state law. Understand how the process works to help someone who's been arrested. What is a Bond? A bond is an amount of money […]

Can I Visit an Inmate if I am on Probation or Parole?

A friend or family member has been arrested and this has created chaos and stress. Before you race off to visit him or her in jail, if you are on probation or parole you need to take the following steps. Find out the Rules Some jails will not allow anyone on probation or parole to […]

What Does a 15 Years to Life Sentence Mean?

A sentence of 15 years to life, 25 years to life or similar sounding words all mean the same thing. The only difference is the time frame. What the Number Means The number in the sentence indicates the minimum number of years the inmate must serve before he or she can be considered for parole. […]

Consequences of Providing Contraband to an Inmate

It is never a good idea to mail contraband to an inmate or to bring it on a visit. The consequences for such actions are serious not only for the inmate, but also for you. What is Contraband? Contraband is anything that inmates are not allowed to have in their possession. Obvious examples are weapons, […]

Voting Rights for Felons in Alabama

The state of Alabama allows felons to have their voting rights restored under the following guidelines. You must have completed your entire sentence, including incarceration, probation, and parole, or community supervision. Once completed, you have three options: Contact your local parole or probation office Write to the Board of Pardons and Parole

Maine Marijuana Laws: Decriminalized but Still Tricky

Decriminalizing Pot doesn't always mean it is completely legal. Here are some current guidelines. Possession Unlike several other states that chose an ounce as the cutoff for a civil penalty, Maine allows you to possess up to 2.5 ounces and still receive a civil ticket. The fine is a flat $600 regardless of the amount. […]

4 Good Places to Find Prison Pen Pals

Learn About Them Through friends. If you know someone who is incarcerated or has a family member incarcerated, ask for the name of an inmate who might like having a pen pal. This is an excellent way to meet pen pals because they can give a personal recommendation. Use Pen Pal Sites. There are several […]

Can a Felon Possess a Gun In Georgia?

Georgia law is very clear on its position regarding convicted felons in that state owning or possessing firearms: It follows the federal law when it comes to guns and felons. The Basics: With the exception of a felony conviction that is non-violent and related exclusively to a business-related crime, if you have ever been convicted […]

Getting a Felon's Voting Rights Restored in Massachusetts

Voting is one of the most fundamental rights given to American citizens, but that right can be lost if you're a convicted felon. It's up to the each state to decide their laws about restoring rights. The laws for Massachusetts include: If You're Charged If you've been charged with a crime, but have not yet […]

Massachusetts Marijuana Laws

Decriminalizing Marijuana doesn't always mean it is completely legal. In some cases, such as in Massachusetts, possession of less than an ounce is no longer a crime but is now a civil offense. Possession It is a civil offense to possess one ounce or less of Marijuana. If found guilty the fine is $100. In […]

Can a Felon Own a Gun In New Mexico?

Generally speaking, federal law makes it a crime for a convicted felon to own or possess a gun or ammunition. If you were convicted of a federal felony crime, you must receive a presidential pardon if you are to ever own a firearm again. Some states, however, have specifically designed laws regarding felons convicted of […]

Why Doesn't An Addict Get Clean After Overdosing?

As told by an addict who overdosed and almost died twice before giving up drugs. How often did you get high before you overdosed? By the time I overdosed the first time, I was getting high on a daily basis. I no longer took drugs to enjoy a high. I took them to avoid being […]

When the Newness of Sobriety Wears Off

Sobriety is like a love relationship. When you start out, everything is exciting and new. When I first got clean, everything I read, saw and heard about sobriety was very attractive to me. I spent my free time getting to know it in the same way I would get to know a new woman. The […]

Hundreds more 'Straight Up Answers'...

Visiting an Inmate in the King County Kent Jail in Washington

If you're interested in visiting an inmate at Seattle's Kent jail, there are several guidelines visitors will have to follow. The following information will walk through the steps and describe the jail's visiting schedule.

Before arriving to the jail, please note that all cell phones, food, drinks, purses, diaper bags, pocket knives and personal items are not permitted in the visiting booth.  The jail does have locker space to store those personal belongings during the visit.

Jails have strict dress codes for all visitors. Kent's dress code does not allow mini-skirts, shorts and any revealing clothing that's low-cut and see-through. All clothes must be appropriate and shoes must be worn at all times.

Children are allowed to visit; however, they must be accompanied by their parent or legal guardian. Adults must be 18 years or older, and legal guardians will need to show proof of their guardianship.
The jail has a special weekday schedule for visits that include children ages 7 and younger. However, they may attend any available timeslot on the weekends.

Monday – Friday: 12pm – 1pm & 4:30pm – 5:30pm

All visits are exactly 30 minutes long, and visitors are encouraged to arrive early to their scheduled appointment. A visit may be cut short due to a large number of visits that day, or it could be cancelled or shortened because of facility issues. Visitors are allowed only one visit on any single day. If a visitor is traveling over 50 miles, they may be allowed a special visit outside the regular visiting schedule. These special visits must be approved with the jail's ITR Sergeant, and the visitor's address information will be checked.

The following behaviors or circumstances will cancel or prevent a visit

  • Showing false I.D information
  • Under the influence of drugs or alcohol
  • Bringing contraband to the visit
  • Using profanity
  • Being disruptive
  • Having a warrant for arrest:

The visiting schedule is arranged by the inmates' last names.

 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

A

8:30-10AM
11 – 1PM

 

3-5:30PM

7-10PM

 

8-10AM

3-5:30PM

B

7-10PM

8:30-10AM
11 – 1PM

 

3-5:30PM

 

8-10AM

3-5:30PM

C

3-5:30PM

 

7-10PM

 

11 – 1PM

11-2PM

7-10PM

D

8:30-10AM
11 – 1PM

 

3-5:30PM

7-10PM

 

8-10AM

3-5:30PM

E

8:30-10AM
11 – 1PM

 

8:30-10AM
11 – 1PM

7-10PM

 

3-5:30PM

8-10AM

F

7-10PM

11 – 1PM

 

3-5:30PM

 

11PM-2

7-10PM

G

 

7-10PM

11 – 1PM

 

3-5:30PM

7-10PM

11-2PM

H

11 – 1PM

 

3-5:30PM

7-10PM

 

7-10PM

11-2PM

I

7-10PM

11 – 1PM

 

3-5:30PM

 

7-10PM

11-2PM

J

 

3-5:30PM

 

11 – 1PM

7-10PM

11-2PM

7-10PM

K

 

7-10PM

8:30-10AM
11 – 1PM

 

3-5:30PM

3-5:30PM

8-10AM

L

3-5:30PM

 

7-10PM

 

8:30-10AM
11 – 1PM

8-10AM

3-5:30PM

M

 

3-5:30PM

 

8:30-10AM
11 – 1PM

7-10PM

3-5:30PM

8-10AM

N

 

3-5:30PM

 

11 – 1PM

7-10PM

7-10PM

11-2PM

O

 

7-10PM

8:30-10AM
11 – 1PM

 

3-5:30PM

8-10AM

3-5:30PM

P

3-5:30PM

 

7-10PM

 

8:30-10AM
11 – 1PM

3-5:30PM

8-10AM

Q

7-10PM

7-10PM

 

3-5:30PM

 

7-10PM

11-2PM

R

 

7-10PM

11 – 1PM

 

3-5:30PM

3-5:30PM

8-10AM

S

 

7-10PM

11 – 1PM

 

3-5:30PM

11-2PM

7-10PM

T

 

11-2PM

 

11 – 1PM

7-10PM

7-10PM

11-2PM

U

7-10PM

7-10PM

 

3-5:30PM

 

11-2PM

7-10PM

V

3-5:30PM

 

7-10PM

 

11 – 1PM

11-2PM

7-10PM

W

7-10PM

11 – 1PM

 

3-5:30PM

 

7-10PM

11-2PM

X

 

11-2PM

 

8:30-10AM
11 – 1PM

7-10PM

8-10AM

3-5:30PM

Y

3-5:30PM

 

7-10PM

 

8:30-10AM
11 – 1PM

3-5:30PM

8-10AM

Z

3-5:30PM

 

7-10PM

 

8:30-10AM
11 – 1PM

8-10AM

3-5:30PM

RELATED: Kent Regional Justice Center Inmate Search

RELATED: Kent Regional Justice Center Inmate Services


writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.

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Communicating with an Inmate Housed at the King County Kent Jail in Washington

If you're sending mail, include the inmate's first and last name, their book of arrest number, 620 W James, Seattle, WA 98104. Inmates can also receive e-mails from their friends and family through Access Corrections. Inmates can still call collect from the King County Kent Jail via the jail's phone service. These calls can also be paid through the inmate's account.

Both mail and e-mail will be inspected before it's received by the inmate. All e-mails are sent through the jail's mail department and must be approved by staff before being received. Traditional mail may only include letters, cards and postcards. The jail will not receive packages, blank paper and envelopes, stamps, pencils, any blank stationary, food, phone cards, clothes or games. When writing letters, avoid decorating with glitter, glue, stickers, lipstick, fragrance, tape or paint, and don't correct mistakes with whiteout; these letters will not be received at Kent. Mailed photographs cannot be nude or partially nude nor contain any gang-related activity.

Inmates may receive magazines and newspapers; however, senders cannot directly send issues and subscriptions to the jail. When placing an order online, change the shipping info to the inmates name and the facility address. All sent publications must be pre-paid by the sender and cannot contain explicit content. Kent will not receive any hardbound books, unless it's for legal reasons and has been approved by staff.

All cash deposits are made in-person at Kent's visiting area. As well, money orders and cashier's checks may be deposited in-person at lobby kiosk. If depositing a money order or cashier's check, please include the inmate's name and book of arrest number; to find the book of arrest number, visit the jail's inmate lookup service. Senders are encouraged to include their address but it's not required.   

Online, family may deposit money into an inmate's account by credit card. The minimum deposit amount is $2.95 and registration with Inmate Deposits is required. To make a deposit over the phone, call 1-886-345-1884. The minimum for phone deposit is $3.95, and all payments are credit-card only.

RELATED: Kent Regional Justice Center Inmate Search

RELATED: Kent Regional Justice Center Inmate Services


writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.

return to top

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