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A Guide to Inmate Visitation Online

Jails across the nation are catching on to the popularity of offering remote, "at-home," visitation. Not only is it convenient for jail staff, inmates, and family members, but it is also a way for the jail to collect revenue because in most cases, at-home visitation is a paid service. How it Works To be able […]

Checking In To Prison – Aaron's Story

When the judge sentenced me to six months in the county jail, my first thought was about my family. Without me there to work and pay the bills, my wife and kids would lose the apartment. My attorney spoke up right away and asked the judge to allow me to check in at a later […]

Finding Employment After Prison

Many companies will not interview a felon, much less hire one. While this is true and it can make life on the outside difficult, finding employment after prison can be done if you take the right steps. Career Centers Goodwill has set up a nationwide career center program to help underemployed and unemployed people and […]

Can a Felon Own a Gun Oklahoma?

Generally speaking, federal law makes it a crime for a convicted felon to own or possess a gun or ammunition. If you were convicted of a federal felony crime, you must receive a presidential pardon if you are to ever own a firearm again. Some states, however, have specifically designed laws regarding felons convicted of […]

Fun Ideas to Mail to Your Inmate

Mail is a great way to communicate with your inmate. In addition to serious letters, here are some fun ways to amuse each other through the mail. These can be done on postcards or letters. Top 10 Each of you make a list of your favorite five things about the other person and also write […]

Prison Skills Applied After Release

Getting out of prison and starting over is not easy, but with a little creative thinking, you can use the abilities you learned while incarcerated into useful tools for life. Organization – Almost everyone who goes into prison comes out much more organized in all aspects of life. Whether it has to do with keeping […]

Helpful Workout Routines if you are in State or Federal Prison

Incarceration is scary. It doesn't matter how old or tough you are, fear is a natural response to being sent to prison. Not showing that fear is one of the most important things you can do to protect yourself while doing your time. Exercise is a perfect tool to alleviate fear. According to Harvard Health […]

Why Commissary is Important

Commissary funds are deposited to an inmate's account so he or she can purchase personal hygiene items, stationery supplies and snacks. Some lists also offer clothing, electronics, books and phone cards, among other things. A Relief from Hunger Inmates are typically fed two to three meals a day. The ingredients are high in calorie and […]

A Bath Salt Addict Describes Why She Gave Them Up

How did you discover bath salts? I was on probation and my probation officer was giving me random drug tests. A friend told me that the current drug screens being used in my county didn't check for bath salts so it would be a high that I couldn't be violated for. I decided to try […]

How to Survive Prison

Most people know the importance of working out and staying physically fit to survive prison, but mental strength and attitude play a huge role in getting through incarceration. Expand Your Skills If the prison offers classes, sign up for some. Whether it is music lessons, anger management or business math, anything you learn is something […]

Consequences of Contraband Mail

At some point you might be tempted to mail contraband to your inmate. After all, how much trouble will it really cause, right? The answer is, plenty. The consequences of being caught mailing contraband to an inmate or an inmate receiving it can be severe. Criminal Charges If your inmate is in a state or […]

Bio-chemical treatment for Alcohol Addiction

One method of treatment for alcoholism is the bio-chemical method. While other recovery paths concentrate on powerlessness over addictions and the acceptance of a higher power, the bio-chemical treatment places importance on stabilizing the brain's chemistry. It has long been known that certain brain chemicals such as dopamine, serotonin and endorphins

How To Keep an Inmate Involved in the Lives of the Children

One of the hardest things for an inmate to deal with is being removed from his or her children. Not being there for daily routines means missing out on much of the child's development and preparation for life. These easy steps will keep your inmate connected and active in the lives of the children. Phone […]

Three Ways to Make Jail Calls Cheaper

Telephone calls are a lifeline between inmates and their families. Just hearing each other's voices helps ease the tension and anxiety surrounding incarceration. As nice as it is to get those calls, they can get expensive. The following three ideas can make the calls fit your budget better. Avoid Peak Hours for Collect Calls Many […]

5 Things Not to Talk About During Jail Calls

When he calls, it is a natural instinct to talk to him about what's going on in your life, but be careful. Never lie to him, but be smart about what topics you bring up to speak about. These 5 things should probably wait for an in person visit or for when he comes home. […]

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The Orange County Juvenile Hall in Orange, Orange County, California, like all jails is a maximum security facility. Because the inmates in this jail range from low level offenders to those being held for violent crimes like robbery, rape and murder, the security level is as high as is it is in any maximum security state prison. Some of the security features in this facility include security cameras, electronic detection and reinforced fencing topped with razor wire. Correctional officers in Orange County Juvenile Hall are armed with mace and trained to use physical force to protect themselves and other inmates from violence.

The men, women and juveniles being held in the Orange County Juvenile Hall are either awaiting trial or have been sentenced in the Orange County Court System already and been sentenced to a period of time of one year or less. When an inmate is sentenced to a year or more, they are admitted into the California Prison or Federal Prison System. Inmates in the Orange County Juvenile Hall are fed three meals a day totaling 2,500 calories, are allowed access to phones to contact friends and family members, are allowed at least one hour a day for exercise, have access to books, bathroom and shower facilities. The inmates are allowed mail to be delivered to them as well as newspapers and magazine from trusted outside publishers.

The other jail facilities in Orange County, California are: Anaheim Detention Facility, Buena Park Jail, Costa Mesa Jail, Cypress Jail, Fullerton Jail, Garden Grove Jail, Huntington Beach Jail, Irvine Jail, La Habra Jail, La Palma Jail, Laguna Beach Jail, Newport Beach Jail, Orange City Police Jail, Orange County Central Men’s Jail, Orange County Central Women’s Jail, Orange County Jail - James A. Musick Facility , Orange County Jail - Theo Lacy Facility, Orange County Jail Intake Release Center, Santa Ana Jail, Westminster Jail. In addition, Orange County houses the following juvenile facilities: Orange County Jail - Theo Lacy Juvenile Annex, Orange County Juvenile - Joplin Youth Center, Orange County Juvenile - Los Pinos Probation Camp, Orange County Juvenile - Youth Guidance Center , Orange County Juvenile - Youth Leadership Academy .

On this page you will find direct links to specific information that friends and family members of inmates will find useful: Orange County Inmate Search, Inmate Phone use, Visitation Rules and Schedules, Commissary Deposits and Information about the Orange County Juvenile Hall Inmate Mail Guidelines. In addition, you will find information on how to contact the facility, directions to the jail, Orange County recent arrests, Most Wanted, outstanding Arrest Warrants and much more.



Orange County Juvenile Hall

Orange County Detention / Probation

STATE COUNTY BEDS
California Orange 380
PHYSICAL ADDRESS
331 The City Drive South
Orange, CA 92868
INMATE MAIL
Juvenile's first and last name
Orange County Juvenile Hall
331 The City Drive South
Orange, CA 92868
FAX
714-935-7581
Visiting hours: Visiting hours at Juvenile Hall are conducted for minors based on the first letter of their last names. A B C - Sunday, 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.... D E F G H - Tuesday, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.... I J K L M - Thursday, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.... N O P Q R - Friday, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.... S T U V W X Y Z - Saturday, 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
 

The Truth about Prison Phone Calls

Your inmate needs to stay connected to friends and family. While lots of information can be shared on the phone, precautions must be taken so that everyone involved can avoid having future problems. Phone Calls are Recorded If your inmate wants to discuss the case with you by phone, use extreme caution going forward. The […]

5 Ways to Help an Addict While he is Away at Rehab

Unless your friend is still living at home with parents and has no bills or responsibilities, he/she is going to need some help while at rehab. The five main reasons addicts worry about being gone are: Pets: If you are an animal lover, you might offer to take his pet in and take of him […]

Pregnant and in Prison – Now What?

Going to prison or jail while you are pregnant sometimes can't be helped, but you will need to be sure you get the proper treatment and medical care while incarcerated. You'll also need to make arrangements for the baby after he or she is born. Banking on the belief you will be released before your […]

Get a Special Visit If You Live Far From the Jail

The logistics of visiting an inmate who is incarcerated very far from where you live can be tricky. If the jail has very short visits or requires a specific visitation registration processes, it makes it even more difficult. Some jails make exceptions for those who must travel to visit the inmate. How Far is Far? […]

When the Newness of Sobriety Wears Off

Sobriety is like a love relationship. When you start out, everything is exciting and new. When I first got clean, everything I read, saw and heard about sobriety was very attractive to me. I spent my free time getting to know it in the same way I would get to know a new woman. The […]

Maine Marijuana Laws: Decriminalized but Still Tricky

Decriminalizing Pot doesn't always mean it is completely legal. Here are some current guidelines. Possession Unlike several other states that chose an ounce as the cutoff for a civil penalty, Maine allows you to possess up to 2.5 ounces and still receive a civil ticket. The fine is a flat $600 regardless of the amount. […]

Why Commissary is Important

Commissary funds are deposited to an inmate's account so he or she can purchase personal hygiene items, stationery supplies and snacks. Some lists also offer clothing, electronics, books and phone cards, among other things. A Relief from Hunger Inmates are typically fed two to three meals a day. The ingredients are high in calorie and […]

Can a Felon Possess a Gun In Illinois?

Illinois law allows certain convicted felons to own or possess guns. Federal law still makes it a crime, and in some cases the feds have pursued prosecution in states that allow it. Only an attorney should advise you on this matter but the basics of Illinois laws are as follows: Your rights can be restored […]

Visiting jail for the first time? Here's what to expect.

Visiting an inmate in jail for the first time is like waiting to see a dentist. The anticipation and worry constantly increases until you are there and you realize it was not as bad as you thought it would be. Knowing what to expect before that first jail visit will reduce your anxiety. Expect to […]

You are on Felony Probation: 4 Things Not To Do

Being on felony probation means you report to a probation officer by phone or in person, typically once a month. Between your reporting dates, you need to stay on your probation officer's good side. 1. Don't associate with felons. Almost all felony probation officers will tell you not to hang around with known felons. It […]

Consequences of Providing Contraband to an Inmate

It is never a good idea to mail contraband to an inmate or to bring it on a visit. The consequences for such actions are serious not only for the inmate, but also for you. What is Contraband? Contraband is anything that inmates are not allowed to have in their possession. Obvious examples are weapons, […]

When 12-Step Programs Don't Work For You

The 12-Step program is not the only method used in rehabs to assist addicts in getting clean and living sober lifestyles. Some rehabs accomplish the same goals through the following means: Medication Medications are available to assist with addiction. For Opiate addicts, the medication blocks Opiate cravings and in some cases will cause you to […]

Notorious Female Criminals in the United States Infographic

For decades, the number of women being convicted of felonies has been rising. The rate is not only changing, but it's changing fast. Are women racing to prison? Is this a competition to see who's the most badass? Females have been linked to the criminal justice system throughout history, but it's clear that they are […]

Five Reasons to Go to Drug Rehab and Stay Out of Jail

You know you have a problem, because lately your life has been falling apart. But going to rehab or seeking outpatient treatment seems like a drastic measure, because you're still surviving. Think about getting help for these reasons: It shows your family you are serious. How many times have you promised to stop using drugs […]

Getting a Felon's Voting Rights Restored in Louisiana

Voting is one of the most fundamental rights given to American citizens, however, once convicted of a felony, whether or not that right will be restored to you is up to the state that you reside in. The laws for Louisiana include: You've Been Charged You cannot vote in Louisiana if you are incarcerated for […]

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Comments 3

  1. Krystin Craft Wed, Feb 02 2011 3:06 PM

    Am I able to contact or call my boyfriend who was recently booked into this facility?

  2. Jane Sun, Oct 06 2013 4:14 AM

    October 2013 Orange County California Juvenile Court Case I recently had to go to the Juvenile Court in Orange County California with my 16 year old son (15 at time of ticket) for a Minor in Possession of alcohol charge. Before going, I searched online to try to learn what was going to happen. All I found were attorney advertisements, but very little information about the reality of what was going to happen. I had questions like these: What exactly was going to happen at the juvenile court appearance in Orange County? Does my child need a lawyer? What will be the likely outcome? Is my child going to get convicted? Will my child lose his license (that he just got) for a year? This post states my experience and gives my opinion on the answers to this question. My child got charged with being in the car with alcohol, (not possessing alcohol . . . just being in the car when there was an unopened container in the driver’s backpack). This is one of the numerous different “Minor In Possession” (MIP) charges. The specific charge was a violation of Vehicle Code 23224 and a conviction mandates a driver’s license suspension of one year. In addition to my own kid’s case, I also watched about 15 other cases as my son’s case was the last one called that day. My son was ticketed and released by a Newport Beach PD Police Officer. Inconsequentially, the ticketing officer made two errors on the original ticket,: 1) stating that the crime was an infraction (it’s a misdemeanor); and 2) noting that the case would be heard at Harbor Justice Center (because he was a juvenile, it was moved to Lamaroeux [The City Drive in Orange]). These errors were corrected before court by notices mailed to our home before the originally assigned court date. The court appearance occurred in October of 2013 at 8:30 a.m. We waited until the last possible day to appear. We arrived at about 8:10 a.m. and went through the metal detectors. We went upstairs to the 2nd floor (take right at the top of the main staircase) and checked in at the clerk’s window by showing the clerk a copy of the ticket (plus correction notices) and giving the minor’s name. The clerk advised us that we were in “Group 1” and to have a seat in the waiting room. There were about 10 other minors with parents already waiting. We got the last two seat. Other people continued to check-in. Everyone who checked in before about 8:20 got put in Group 1. I’d recommend getting there early to try to get into the Group1 and even earlier if you want to sit for the 30 to 45 minute wait. At 9:00 a.m., a bailiff came in and called for Group 1. Everyone in Group 1 filed out and followed the bailiff to the courtroom. I felt sorry for Group 2 people. Who knows how long they had to wait? We entered a nice courtroom and sat in the gallery seating. There is a Spanish translator assigned to the courtroom who was already in there sitting at one of the counsel tables. All of the English speakers were seated on one side of the gallery and all of the Spanish speakers were seated on the other side. The Spanish speakers were handed out headsets to listen to the Spanish translation. The Judge took the bench and set out sound ground rules. I do not remember everything he said, but I was basically a rendition of the minor’s legal rights and an advisement that parents were welcome to participate but that the minor’s were in the Spanish speakers as the Judge talked. The Judge then began calling the cases individually. The Judge was a stern, no-nonsense African American fellow and he was demanded respect. If a minor answered “yeah,” or really anything other than “Yes, Sir” or “Yes, Your Honor,” the Judge reprimanded the minor for lack of respect and told the minor to sit back down. So, definitely dress nice, show respect and be on your very best behavior. The first kid to get called up got asked by the Judge if he wanted to waive his rights and discuss the case right then and there. The alternative was that the minor refuse to waive rights, essentially claiming to be “not guilty” and the Judge would have set a date for a juvenile trial. When the first kid got asked if he would waive his rights, he did not know what to do. This was a stressful situation to be in because the poor kid did not know what was going to happen if he waived his rights. Those of us not having to go first got to see what was going to happen and could use that information in making our decision. Ultimately everyone ended up agreeing to waive their rights and deal with their case that day. The first kid was charged with a MIP violation too. So, it was a good indicator of what was going to happen to my kid. The kid eventually agreed to waive his rights and speak to the Judge about his case. The Judge asked the kid some questions about the facts of the case and how he did in school. The Judge also asked what the kid’s curfew time was. The Judge asked if he drug tested the kid right now if the kid would test clean or dirty. After quizzing the kid, making sure he was not an evil brat, and reading him the riot act, the Judge basically had he kid admit to that there was probably cause against him, (without using that term) and then the Judge sentenced him right there. This scenario was repeated with all the cases. Basically, there were about three different outcomes for all of the cases: Most kids got sentenced to one 8 hour class and 15 hours of community service. If the kid was there on an infraction or a misdemeanor (such as a curfew violation, a MIP charge, a drug charge, an alcohol or drug consumption charge), then the Judge sentenced those kids to one 8 hour alcohol/drug class for minors and 15 hours of community service. The kids got two months to complete the class and the community service hours. If they submitted proof of completion, then the charge would be dismissed completely, meaning the kids would not have a conviction on their record. A few kids got sentenced to one Juvenile class (which was referred to as a “J” class) and 15 hours community service. (These kids may have also had to do the other alcohol class too, but I am not real sure on that.) The “J” class was for the kids that were in trouble for the 2nd time for something relatively minor (meaning curfew, alcohol or marijuana). There may have also been a few kids who got a few more hours of community service, but I honestly cannot recall exactly. There was one kid who had been in trouble 2 times before (both for marijuana). This kid told the Judge that he did not want to waive his rights and that he was not going to admit that he did anything wrong. (He was accused of smoking pot out of a bong in a moving vehicle. He denied it, saying he was passing the bong to the driver so he could take a hit) He had already got sentenced to the two options stated above on other occasions. The Judge contemplated committing this kid to in-patient treatment at Juvenile Hall, but ultimately decided against it. The Judge also discussed with the parents putting the kid on 6 months probation. Ultimately, the Judge gave him the higher level “J” class again and community service. There was one case where 3 kids were accused of taking their parent’s car without permission, stealing a bottle of alcohol from Ralph’s and getting pulled over with marijuana. One of the three kids was 13 years old. The Judge spent about 20 minutes on this case, openly admitting he wanted to impress the seriousness of the situation on the 13 year old. Another kid got caught with meth. Ultimately, both of these kids all got sentenced to the 2nd option stated above. When your case is done, you will be handed a packet of documents and told to return to the clerk’s office where you checked in. You just go back in and have a seat. The clerk will call the minor’s name when the file comes back from the courtroom. The clerk will explain to the minor and the parent where to find the class that needs to be attended and how to document proof of community service. You will also get the address you need to mail your proof in. Once you have that information, you are all good to go and you are done with going to court! The bottom line is that the Orange County Judge did not appear to want to penalize these minors and give them criminal records. If your kid is going to court for the first time on a relatively minor offense, you do not need an attorney. No one really had one. Your kid is only going to have to go to court one time. He or she is not going to suffer a conviction. He or she is not going to get his driver’s license suspended. The minor I accompanied could have suffered a one year suspension of his driver’s license if the Judge really wanted to be a jerk. But all of the cases handled that day resulted in the kids just having to do a class and community service to get the entire matter dismissed. I hope this helps with what to expect.

  3. Verania Venegas Thu, Feb 20 2014 9:30 PM

    I cant get in contact with my cousin, and every time he trys to call me I cant receive the call because I have to pay but I don't know how to pay or what to do so I can get in contact with him.. Help ??

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