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Dealing with a Drug Addict: How I Started Letting Go

If you are dealing with an addict in your life, you already know that you won't be able to keep it up forever. There will come a point where you will need to reclaim your life and get back among the living. Years ago, I began taking gradual steps toward letting go and by the […]

When Your Online Search Doesn't Find Your Inmate

Many jails have online databases listing those who have been arrested. In some cases, the database is updated every few minutes. If you do a search but nothing comes up, it doesn't necessarily mean your loved one is not incarcerated. There are several reasons an inmate can be in jail but not showing up in […]

When the Newness of Sobriety Wears Off

Sobriety is like a love relationship. When you start out, everything is exciting and new. When I first got clean, everything I read, saw and heard about sobriety was very attractive to me. I spent my free time getting to know it in the same way I would get to know a new woman. The […]

An Inmate Can Meditate to Alleviate Fears in Prison

If someone you know is in prison, you can be sure there is stress involved in that inmate's daily life. Prisons are loud, can be dangerous and there is very little freedom. In addition, simply being sentenced to do time disrupts life with regard to employment, family and other outside obligations. By the time the […]

When 12-Step Programs Don't Work For You

The 12-Step program is not the only method used in rehabs to assist addicts in getting clean and living sober lifestyles. Some rehabs accomplish the same goals through the following means: Medication Medications are available to assist with addiction. For Opiate addicts, the medication blocks Opiate cravings and in some cases will cause you to […]

He is a Drug Addict, but he Keeps Passing Drug Tests – How?

The probation department has the ability to send a test off to be examined for tampering, but you don't have those same connections. Understanding how they can be cheated will help you test him more effectively. Related: How do America's drug courts work? The Houdini switch Drug users have this down to a science. Everyone […]

Consequences of Contraband Mail

At some point you might be tempted to mail contraband to your inmate. After all, how much trouble will it really cause, right? The answer is, plenty. The consequences of being caught mailing contraband to an inmate or an inmate receiving it can be severe. Criminal Charges If your inmate is in a state or […]

Drug Addiction and Anger: Why Should I Do Anything for Him After All He Did?

When your boyfriend was doing drugs, there was chaos everywhere he went. Now that he completed rehab and is in recovery, he might need assistance with a few things to get started again. Putting your anger aside and helping him can provide the following benefits. Self-confidence: Whether he admits it or not, when he was […]

How to Send a Book to an Inmate

Almost all jails and prisons require that books be sent to inmates directly from the publisher or a reputable online vendor, such as Amazon.com or BarnesandNoble.com. This requirement actually makes it simpler for you because you can compare prices easily and avoid shopping trips away from home or work and packaging time. How to Order […]

Can a Felon Own a Gun Oklahoma?

Generally speaking, federal law makes it a crime for a convicted felon to own or possess a gun or ammunition. If you were convicted of a federal felony crime, you must receive a presidential pardon if you are to ever own a firearm again. Some states, however, have specifically designed laws regarding felons convicted of […]

4 Things to Tell Young Kids When Dad is In Jail

While your husband is incarcerated, your children will want to know what has happened. These four things can ease their mind without burdening them. Explain why he went. Without being specific about the exact crime he is accused of, you can tell the children that the judge thinks their dad broke the law and he […]

Inmate Voting Rights: Can I Vote After Being Convicted of a Misdemeanor Offense?

In most states, once you are released from jail for your misdemeanor conviction your voting rights are fully restored. In some cases, you are still allowed to vote even while incarcerated. In the states of Idaho, Kentucky, Indiana, South Carolina, Michigan, South Dakota and Missouri, if you are in jail or prison due to a […]

Can a Felon Own a Gun In West Virginia?

West Virginia still requires you to receive a pardon from the governor's office before you can own/possess a gun in that state. Obtaining a pardon in West Virginia is very difficult. Over a recent period of nine different governors, only 131 pardons were granted out of all that applied. An attorney experienced in obtaining felony […]

Cost Effective Ways to Visit an Inmate

The expenses of traveling to visit your inmate can add up quickly. These cost saving measures will make it less painful for your budget. Traveling by car Gas up early Gas up on a weekday. Many gas stations raise the price of a gallon shortly before the weekend. Filling up the tank on a weekday, […]

What Type of Arrest Warrants Will Cause Social Security Benefits to Stop?

The Social Security Administration (SSA) can only stop your benefits if the arrest warrant is for a fleeing crime. If there is a warrant for something other than fleeing, it does not qualify for benefit cut off or forced repayment. Historically, the SSA stopped benefits for anyone who had an arrest warrant for any reason. […]

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The Orange County Juvenile Hall in Orange, Orange County, California, like all jails is a maximum security facility. Because the inmates in this jail range from low level offenders to those being held for violent crimes like robbery, rape and murder, the security level is as high as is it is in any maximum security state prison. Some of the security features in this facility include security cameras, electronic detection and reinforced fencing topped with razor wire. Correctional officers in Orange County Juvenile Hall are armed with mace and trained to use physical force to protect themselves and other inmates from violence.

The men, women and juveniles being held in the Orange County Juvenile Hall are either awaiting trial or have been sentenced in the Orange County Court System already and been sentenced to a period of time of one year or less. When an inmate is sentenced to a year or more, they are admitted into the California Prison or Federal Prison System. Inmates in the Orange County Juvenile Hall are fed three meals a day totaling 2,500 calories, are allowed access to phones to contact friends and family members, are allowed at least one hour a day for exercise, have access to books, bathroom and shower facilities. The inmates are allowed mail to be delivered to them as well as newspapers and magazine from trusted outside publishers.

The other jail facilities in Orange County, California are: Anaheim Detention Facility, Buena Park Jail, Costa Mesa Jail, Cypress Jail, Fullerton Jail, Garden Grove Jail, Huntington Beach Jail, Irvine Jail, La Habra Jail, La Palma Jail, Laguna Beach Jail, Newport Beach Jail, Orange City Police Jail, Orange County Central Men’s Jail, Orange County Central Women’s Jail, Orange County Jail - James A. Musick Facility , Orange County Jail - Theo Lacy Facility, Orange County Jail Intake Release Center, Santa Ana Jail, Westminster Jail. In addition, Orange County houses the following juvenile facilities: Orange County Jail - Theo Lacy Juvenile Annex, Orange County Juvenile - Joplin Youth Center, Orange County Juvenile - Los Pinos Probation Camp, Orange County Juvenile - Youth Guidance Center , Orange County Juvenile - Youth Leadership Academy .

On this page you will find direct links to specific information that friends and family members of inmates will find useful: Orange County Inmate Search, Inmate Phone use, Visitation Rules and Schedules, Commissary Deposits and Information about the Orange County Juvenile Hall Inmate Mail Guidelines. In addition, you will find information on how to contact the facility, directions to the jail, Orange County recent arrests, Most Wanted, outstanding Arrest Warrants and much more.

Orange County Juvenile Hall

Orange County Detention / Probation

California Orange 380
331 The City Drive South
Orange, CA 92868
Visiting hours: Visiting hours at Juvenile Hall are conducted for minors based on the first letter of their last names. A B C - Sunday, 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.... D E F G H - Tuesday, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.... I J K L M - Thursday, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.... N O P Q R - Friday, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.... S T U V W X Y Z - Saturday, 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Getting a Felon's Voting Rights Restored in Florida

Voting is one of the most fundamental rights given to American citizens, but once you're convicted of a felony, whether or not that right will be restored to you is up to the state that you reside in. Florida overview: The Process If you have been convicted of a felony, the state of Florida has […]

What Info Can I Get From An Inmate Search?

Nothing is scarier than a missing person. You're frantic to find out what happened. Then it hits you: Maybe your loved one got arrested. Many jails have websites that allow you to look up inmates currently in custody. Some even list those who were booked and recently released. But an inmate search can tell you […]

5 Steps to Mailing Commissary Money to a Federal Inmate

In addition to these five steps below, keep in mind that when you mail the commissary funds, they must go through the United States Postal Service. You cannot use Federal Express, United Parcel or other similar services. Step 1 Know where to send it. All federal commissary money must be sent to a central post […]

Inmate Mail: How to Get an Envelope or Post Card Pre-Metered

If the facility that your inmate is in will only accept pre-metered mail, it is important to know how to get that done. Sticking a regular stamp on it and sending it will only get it sent back or discarded. Your inmate will never see it. You have several options: Get it Pre-Metered at the […]

Maine Marijuana Laws: Decriminalized but Still Tricky

Decriminalizing Pot doesn't always mean it is completely legal. Here are some current guidelines. Possession Unlike several other states that chose an ounce as the cutoff for a civil penalty, Maine allows you to possess up to 2.5 ounces and still receive a civil ticket. The fine is a flat $600 regardless of the amount. […]

Solitary Confinement for Teenagers is a Bad Idea. Here's What We Can Do About It.

Inhumane disciplinary isolation for incarcerated children is causing suicides and other harm. All who believe that teenagers deserve special attention at their time of need will be interested in the recommendations in this New York Times piece. Read about it here: End Solitary Confinement for Teenagers

Getting a Felon's Voting Rights Restored in Louisiana

Voting is one of the most fundamental rights given to American citizens, however, once convicted of a felony, whether or not that right will be restored to you is up to the state that you reside in. The laws for Louisiana include: If You've Been Charged You cannot vote in Louisiana if you are incarcerated […]

Average Prison Sentence Per Offense

The one thing that is consistent about US prison sentences is their inconsistency. Each state sets its own rules to use for each criminal offense. The more serious crimes, called felonies, are typically given longer sentences, while less serious crimes, called misdemeanors have shorter sentences. Taking a life — A premeditated murder can result

A Guide to Inmate Visitation Online

Jails across the nation are catching on to the popularity of offering remote, "at-home," visitation. Not only is it convenient for jail staff, inmates, and family members, but it is also a way for the jail to collect revenue because in most cases, at-home visitation is a paid service. How it Works To be able […]

5 Facts About Your Supplemental Security Income Payments While You Are Incarcerated

In many cases, you don't have control over the number of days you spend in jail, but if you are planning on not bonding out in the hopes of building time on a future sentence or getting a time served release, be sure to watch the calendar so you do not get your payments suspended. […]

The Three Most Dangerous Prisons in America

There are many factors that go into choosing the most dangerous prisons in the USA. The media spotlights isolated cases of prison violence, which makes that facility seem dangerous. The fact is there is danger in every prison, but some are more notorious for San Quentin State Prison: San Rafael, California There are more death […]

How Does a Bail Bond Process Work?

Many states allow defendants to be released from jail to wait for court by paying a percentage of the total bond amount. Percentages range from 10 to 20 percent depending on state law. Understand how the process works to help someone who's been arrested. What is a Bond? A bond is an amount of money […]

Massachusetts Marijuana Laws

Decriminalizing Marijuana doesn't always mean it is completely legal. In some cases, such as in Massachusetts, possession of less than an ounce is no longer a crime but is now a civil offense. Possession It is a civil offense to possess one ounce or less of Marijuana. If found guilty the fine is $100. In […]

Getting a Felon's Voting Rights Restored in Hawaii

Voting is one of the most fundamental rights given to American citizens, however, once you've been convicted of a felony, whether or not that right will be restored to you is up to the state that you reside in. The laws for Hawaii include: If You Have Been Charged In Hawaii you maintain your right […]

How To Keep an Inmate Involved in the Lives of the Children

One of the hardest things for an inmate to deal with is being removed from his or her children. Not being there for daily routines means missing out on much of the child's development and preparation for life. These easy steps will keep your inmate connected and active in the lives of the children. Phone […]

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Comments 3

  1. Krystin Craft Wed, Feb 02 2011 3:06 PM

    Am I able to contact or call my boyfriend who was recently booked into this facility?

  2. Jane Sun, Oct 06 2013 4:14 AM

    October 2013 Orange County California Juvenile Court Case I recently had to go to the Juvenile Court in Orange County California with my 16 year old son (15 at time of ticket) for a Minor in Possession of alcohol charge. Before going, I searched online to try to learn what was going to happen. All I found were attorney advertisements, but very little information about the reality of what was going to happen. I had questions like these: What exactly was going to happen at the juvenile court appearance in Orange County? Does my child need a lawyer? What will be the likely outcome? Is my child going to get convicted? Will my child lose his license (that he just got) for a year? This post states my experience and gives my opinion on the answers to this question. My child got charged with being in the car with alcohol, (not possessing alcohol . . . just being in the car when there was an unopened container in the driver’s backpack). This is one of the numerous different “Minor In Possession” (MIP) charges. The specific charge was a violation of Vehicle Code 23224 and a conviction mandates a driver’s license suspension of one year. In addition to my own kid’s case, I also watched about 15 other cases as my son’s case was the last one called that day. My son was ticketed and released by a Newport Beach PD Police Officer. Inconsequentially, the ticketing officer made two errors on the original ticket,: 1) stating that the crime was an infraction (it’s a misdemeanor); and 2) noting that the case would be heard at Harbor Justice Center (because he was a juvenile, it was moved to Lamaroeux [The City Drive in Orange]). These errors were corrected before court by notices mailed to our home before the originally assigned court date. The court appearance occurred in October of 2013 at 8:30 a.m. We waited until the last possible day to appear. We arrived at about 8:10 a.m. and went through the metal detectors. We went upstairs to the 2nd floor (take right at the top of the main staircase) and checked in at the clerk’s window by showing the clerk a copy of the ticket (plus correction notices) and giving the minor’s name. The clerk advised us that we were in “Group 1” and to have a seat in the waiting room. There were about 10 other minors with parents already waiting. We got the last two seat. Other people continued to check-in. Everyone who checked in before about 8:20 got put in Group 1. I’d recommend getting there early to try to get into the Group1 and even earlier if you want to sit for the 30 to 45 minute wait. At 9:00 a.m., a bailiff came in and called for Group 1. Everyone in Group 1 filed out and followed the bailiff to the courtroom. I felt sorry for Group 2 people. Who knows how long they had to wait? We entered a nice courtroom and sat in the gallery seating. There is a Spanish translator assigned to the courtroom who was already in there sitting at one of the counsel tables. All of the English speakers were seated on one side of the gallery and all of the Spanish speakers were seated on the other side. The Spanish speakers were handed out headsets to listen to the Spanish translation. The Judge took the bench and set out sound ground rules. I do not remember everything he said, but I was basically a rendition of the minor’s legal rights and an advisement that parents were welcome to participate but that the minor’s were in the Spanish speakers as the Judge talked. The Judge then began calling the cases individually. The Judge was a stern, no-nonsense African American fellow and he was demanded respect. If a minor answered “yeah,” or really anything other than “Yes, Sir” or “Yes, Your Honor,” the Judge reprimanded the minor for lack of respect and told the minor to sit back down. So, definitely dress nice, show respect and be on your very best behavior. The first kid to get called up got asked by the Judge if he wanted to waive his rights and discuss the case right then and there. The alternative was that the minor refuse to waive rights, essentially claiming to be “not guilty” and the Judge would have set a date for a juvenile trial. When the first kid got asked if he would waive his rights, he did not know what to do. This was a stressful situation to be in because the poor kid did not know what was going to happen if he waived his rights. Those of us not having to go first got to see what was going to happen and could use that information in making our decision. Ultimately everyone ended up agreeing to waive their rights and deal with their case that day. The first kid was charged with a MIP violation too. So, it was a good indicator of what was going to happen to my kid. The kid eventually agreed to waive his rights and speak to the Judge about his case. The Judge asked the kid some questions about the facts of the case and how he did in school. The Judge also asked what the kid’s curfew time was. The Judge asked if he drug tested the kid right now if the kid would test clean or dirty. After quizzing the kid, making sure he was not an evil brat, and reading him the riot act, the Judge basically had he kid admit to that there was probably cause against him, (without using that term) and then the Judge sentenced him right there. This scenario was repeated with all the cases. Basically, there were about three different outcomes for all of the cases: Most kids got sentenced to one 8 hour class and 15 hours of community service. If the kid was there on an infraction or a misdemeanor (such as a curfew violation, a MIP charge, a drug charge, an alcohol or drug consumption charge), then the Judge sentenced those kids to one 8 hour alcohol/drug class for minors and 15 hours of community service. The kids got two months to complete the class and the community service hours. If they submitted proof of completion, then the charge would be dismissed completely, meaning the kids would not have a conviction on their record. A few kids got sentenced to one Juvenile class (which was referred to as a “J” class) and 15 hours community service. (These kids may have also had to do the other alcohol class too, but I am not real sure on that.) The “J” class was for the kids that were in trouble for the 2nd time for something relatively minor (meaning curfew, alcohol or marijuana). There may have also been a few kids who got a few more hours of community service, but I honestly cannot recall exactly. There was one kid who had been in trouble 2 times before (both for marijuana). This kid told the Judge that he did not want to waive his rights and that he was not going to admit that he did anything wrong. (He was accused of smoking pot out of a bong in a moving vehicle. He denied it, saying he was passing the bong to the driver so he could take a hit) He had already got sentenced to the two options stated above on other occasions. The Judge contemplated committing this kid to in-patient treatment at Juvenile Hall, but ultimately decided against it. The Judge also discussed with the parents putting the kid on 6 months probation. Ultimately, the Judge gave him the higher level “J” class again and community service. There was one case where 3 kids were accused of taking their parent’s car without permission, stealing a bottle of alcohol from Ralph’s and getting pulled over with marijuana. One of the three kids was 13 years old. The Judge spent about 20 minutes on this case, openly admitting he wanted to impress the seriousness of the situation on the 13 year old. Another kid got caught with meth. Ultimately, both of these kids all got sentenced to the 2nd option stated above. When your case is done, you will be handed a packet of documents and told to return to the clerk’s office where you checked in. You just go back in and have a seat. The clerk will call the minor’s name when the file comes back from the courtroom. The clerk will explain to the minor and the parent where to find the class that needs to be attended and how to document proof of community service. You will also get the address you need to mail your proof in. Once you have that information, you are all good to go and you are done with going to court! The bottom line is that the Orange County Judge did not appear to want to penalize these minors and give them criminal records. If your kid is going to court for the first time on a relatively minor offense, you do not need an attorney. No one really had one. Your kid is only going to have to go to court one time. He or she is not going to suffer a conviction. He or she is not going to get his driver’s license suspended. The minor I accompanied could have suffered a one year suspension of his driver’s license if the Judge really wanted to be a jerk. But all of the cases handled that day resulted in the kids just having to do a class and community service to get the entire matter dismissed. I hope this helps with what to expect.

  3. Verania Venegas Thu, Feb 20 2014 9:30 PM

    I cant get in contact with my cousin, and every time he trys to call me I cant receive the call because I have to pay but I don't know how to pay or what to do so I can get in contact with him.. Help ??

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