Jail Exchange, Every Jail, Every Prison, Every Facility in the Country
NAV
Skip Navigation LinksCounty Jails > California > San Diego > San Diego County Central Jail

+Straight Up Answers

Can a Felon Own a Gun In West Virginia?

West Virginia still requires you to receive a pardon from the governor's office before you can own/possess a gun in that state. Obtaining a pardon in West Virginia is very difficult. Over a recent period of nine different governors, only 131 pardons were granted out of all that applied. An attorney experienced in obtaining felony […]

Caring for an Inmate, Even If You Can't Visit the Jail or Prison

Visits are a lifeline for most inmates, but if his jail is very far away, or there are other reasons that make it impossible for you to visit, there are other steps you can take to let him know he is not alone. Lots of mail: Even if you can't write a letter each day […]

Getting a Felon's Voting Rights Restored in Illinois

Voting is one of the most fundamental rights given to American citizens, however, once convicted of a felony, whether or not that right will be restored to you is up to the state that you reside in. The laws for Illinois include: If You've Been Charged Until you are convicted of a felony and incarcerated […]

Inmate Care Packages and How They Work

If your inmate is incarcerated in a jail that offers a care package program, you can have some fun surprising your inmate from time to time with a box full of things that you've personally selected for him or her. The Basics Inmate care packages are boxes or bags that are pre-filled with items from […]

Get a Special Visit If You Live Far From the Jail

The logistics of visiting an inmate who is incarcerated very far from where you live can be tricky. If the jail has very short visits or requires a specific visitation registration processes, it makes it even more difficult. Some jails make exceptions for those who must travel to visit the inmate. How Far is Far? […]

Should I Tell My Kids I am an Addict?

If your children are over the age of six or seven they should be told if you are addicted to drugs. Children aren't stupid, and no matter how much you think you are keeping the big secret, they know something is wrong. Their imagination is going to run wild until you give them some information. […]

Why and How Drugs Are Divided Into Different Classes and Levels

The class of drug is typically included in the criminal charge for possession, sale or use. For examples, the charge would read, "Possession of a Class I drug for resale," or "Possession of a Class II drug". How They're Classed While each agency determines which drugs fall into each schedule, class or level, they are […]

Bio-chemical treatment for Alcohol Addiction

One method of treatment for alcoholism is the bio-chemical method. While other recovery paths concentrate on powerlessness over addictions and the acceptance of a higher power, the bio-chemical treatment places importance on stabilizing the brain's chemistry. It has long been known that certain brain chemicals such as dopamine, serotonin and endorphins

Getting a Felon's Voting Rights Restored in Florida

Voting is one of the most fundamental rights given to American citizens, but once you're convicted of a felony, whether or not that right will be restored to you is up to the state that you reside in. Florida overview: The Process If you have been convicted of a felony, the state of Florida has […]

Five Reasons to Go to Drug Rehab and Stay Out of Jail

You know you have a problem, because lately your life has been falling apart. But going to rehab or seeking outpatient treatment seems like a drastic measure, because you're still surviving. Think about getting help for these reasons: It shows your family you are serious. How many times have you promised to stop using drugs […]

How to Survive Prison

Most people know the importance of working out and staying physically fit to survive prison, but mental strength and attitude play a huge role in getting through incarceration. Expand Your Skills If the prison offers classes, sign up for some. Whether it is music lessons, anger management or business math, anything you learn is something […]

Losing SSI and SSDI Benefits While Incarcerated

Your husband goes to jail and you figure his Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits will at least help with the bills even though he is not home to receive them. When the payments stop, there are four reasons why this may happen. Here are the four stages of the […]

Fun Ideas for Inmate Mail

Writing to your inmate is an invaluable way to communicate. You'll have your share of serious life issues letters, but here are some fun ways to entertain each other through letters. These can be done on postcards, too. Top 5 + 5 = 10 Each of you make a list of your favorite five things […]

With One Free Jail Call, Who Should I Reach Out To When I Get Arrested?

Anyone who has been incarcerated will tell you that once you are booked, given inmate attire, and assigned to a housing unit, your connection with the outside world is greatly reduced. During the booking process most jails will allow you one free phone call before taking you to your unit. Make it count. Very few […]

Consequences of Contraband Mail

At some point you might be tempted to mail contraband to your inmate. After all, how much trouble will it really cause, right? The answer is, plenty. The consequences of being caught mailing contraband to an inmate or an inmate receiving it can be severe. Criminal Charges If your inmate is in a state or […]

Hundreds more 'Straight Up Answers'...

The San Diego County Central Jail in San Diego, San Diego County, California, like all jails is a maximum security facility. Because the inmates in this jail range from low level offenders to those being held for violent crimes like robbery, rape and murder, the security level is as high as is it is in any maximum security state prison. Some of the security features in this facility include security cameras, electronic detection and reinforced fencing topped with razor wire. Correctional officers in San Diego County Central Jail are armed with mace and trained to use physical force to protect themselves and other inmates from violence.

The men, women and juveniles being held in the San Diego County Central Jail are either awaiting trial or have been sentenced in the San Diego County Court System already and been sentenced to a period of time of one year or less. When an inmate is sentenced to a year or more, they are admitted into the California Prison or Federal Prison System. Inmates in the San Diego County Central Jail are fed three meals a day totaling 2,500 calories, are allowed access to phones to contact friends and family members, are allowed at least one hour a day for exercise, have access to books, bathroom and shower facilities. The inmates are allowed mail to be delivered to them as well as newspapers and magazine from trusted outside publishers.

The other jail facilities in San Diego County, California are: Chula Vista City Jail, San Diego City Jail, San Diego County Detention Bureau, San Diego County Facility 8 Jail, San Diego County Jail - Bailey Detention Center, San Diego County Jail - East Mesa Re-Entry Facility, San Diego County Jail - Las Colinas Women's Detention Facility, San Diego County Jail - Vista Detention Facility, San Diego County South Bay Facility. In addition, San Diego County houses the following juvenile facilities: San Diego Co.-Camp Barrett, San Diego Co.-East Mesa Juvenile, San Diego Co.-Kearny Mesa, SD CO. - Girls’ Rehabilitation Facility, SD CO. - Juvenile Ranch Facility.

On this page you will find direct links to specific information that friends and family members of inmates will find useful: San Diego County Inmate Search, Inmate Phone use, Visitation Rules and Schedules, Commissary Deposits and Information about the San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Mail Guidelines. In addition, you will find information on how to contact the facility, directions to the jail, San Diego County recent arrests, Most Wanted, outstanding Arrest Warrants and much more.



San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Search

SDCJ

San Diego County Jail

San Diego Central Jail - Downtown

STATE COUNTY BEDS
California San Diego 980
 

Deciding How Much Money to Put on the Books

What does the inmate need? Contact the jail and ask what basics are supplied. Most jails give the inmates toothpaste, toothbrushes, shampoo, soap and toilet paper. Ask them what happens if the inmate runs out of something. is it replaced right away or do they have to wait a week or longer for new supplies […]

Can a Felon Possess a Gun In Georgia?

Georgia law is very clear on its position regarding convicted felons in that state owning or possessing firearms: It follows the federal law when it comes to guns and felons. The Basics: With the exception of a felony conviction that is non-violent and related exclusively to a business-related crime, if you have ever been convicted […]

How To Keep an Inmate Involved in the Lives of the Children

One of the hardest things for an inmate to deal with is being removed from his or her children. Not being there for daily routines means missing out on much of the child's development and preparation for life. These easy steps will keep your inmate connected and active in the lives of the children. Phone […]

5 Facts About Your Supplemental Security Income Payments While You Are Incarcerated

In many cases, you don't have control over the number of days you spend in jail, but if you are planning on not bonding out in the hopes of building time on a future sentence or getting a time served release, be sure to watch the calendar so you do not get your payments suspended. […]

He Expected Probation, Instead He Went to Jail.

My name is Jonathan. I thought I was going to get probation. Everyone I knew got probation for the same charge, but when I was called in front of the judge, he sentenced me to 30 days in jail. I was handcuffed, taken into custody in front of everyone in the courtroom, and brought to […]

5 Steps to Mailing Commissary Money to a Federal Inmate

In addition to these five steps below, keep in mind that when you mail the commissary funds, they must go through the United States Postal Service. You cannot use Federal Express, United Parcel or other similar services. Step 1 Know where to send it. All federal commissary money must be sent to a central post […]

What to do if a Family Member Goes Missing

When a family member goes missing, it strikes fear in the heart of loved ones but panicking will not help the situation. The following steps can narrow the search and if authorities become involved will help them streamline the process. Contact authorities. Tell them you do not wish to wait 24 hours because your family […]

Five Fun Photo Ideas to Send Pictures to Your Inmate

Face it. You can only send so many selfies, family group shots or photos of the dog on the couch to your inmate before it becomes boring for both of you. Try these ideas to spice up the fun! Have a party for the inmate Gather friends and family together and have a party. Choose […]

How to find out if you've been a Victim of Fraud

In most cases of fraud, the victim's identity is stolen and unauthorized purchases are made. News stories report victims making the discovery after they are thousands of dollars in debt for things they never purchased. There are usually signs before it gets to that point, but you have to know what to look for. Obtain […]

When Your Online Search Doesn't Find Your Inmate

Many jails have online databases listing those who have been arrested. In some cases, the database is updated every few minutes. If you do a search but nothing comes up, it doesn't necessarily mean your loved one is not incarcerated. There are several reasons an inmate can be in jail but not showing up in […]

4 Things to Avoid During An Arrest

Only an attorney should advise you of your individual arrest situation but in general, these four suggestions may help stabilize your situation. Don't try and argue your way out. In most cases, by the time the cuffs come out, there is no turning back. Arguing, negotiating, and continuing to try to avoid arrest will do […]

Fun Ideas for Inmate Mail

Writing to your inmate is an invaluable way to communicate. You'll have your share of serious life issues letters, but here are some fun ways to entertain each other through letters. These can be done on postcards, too. Top 5 + 5 = 10 Each of you make a list of your favorite five things […]

Getting a Felon's Voting Rights Restored in Michigan

Voting is one of the most fundamental rights given to American citizens, however, once convicted of a felony, whether or not that right will be restored to you is up to the state that you reside in. The laws for Michigan include: Pending Cases If you are charged with a crime, but have not yet […]

Notorious Female Criminals in the United States Infographic

For decades, the number of women being convicted of felonies has been rising. The rate is not only changing, but it's changing fast. Are women racing to prison? Is this a competition to see who's the most badass? Females have been linked to the criminal justice system throughout history, but it's clear that they are […]

Why and How Drugs Are Divided Into Different Classes and Levels

The class of drug is typically included in the criminal charge for possession, sale or use. For examples, the charge would read, "Possession of a Class I drug for resale," or "Possession of a Class II drug". How They're Classed While each agency determines which drugs fall into each schedule, class or level, they are […]

Hundreds more 'Straight Up Answers'...

Comment or Ask a Question.
No registration required.

Comments 7

  1. Donovan F Mon, Apr 09 2012 1:56 PM

    I found your website on google when I searched for San Diego Jail inmates and I want to commend you for the best information I found so far... easy to use!!! Thank you.

  2. Laurie Fields Wed, May 02 2012 2:38 PM

    How often is the inmate search feature updated? At what point should we hire a Criminal Lawyer, before he gets released or after he is out on bail?

  3. Melinda C Wed, Sep 05 2012 12:15 PM

    How can I see my sons mugshot?

  4. Ash Fri, Feb 08 2013 2:03 AM

    I was in San Diego Central Jail and I want to know is there any way I can get my booking photo off the internet? It is messing up all my job searches and I hope I can find some way to get my arrest record taken off the web - it's supposed to be expunged after a year, but I still see it everyone online!

  5. Chris Fri, Feb 08 2013 4:31 PM

    Your site popped up at the top of my search for jail inmates in San Diego Central Jail and I just wanted to say thanks for all the great information you have on this site about the jail. I was able to do an inmate search really easily! In response to the person above me, no - your information is probably on the internet forever since it was public record information.

  6. Wendy Chang Sun, Feb 10 2013 9:53 AM

    How are the guards at this facility? I've heard some disturbing stories about them. Do they treat the immates fairly? Do they tend to pick on certain groups? If so, which ones? Thanks!

  7. Megan Sat, Feb 16 2013 6:09 PM

    I read on another site that San Diego Central Jail is a "state of the art facility." What exactly does that mean and how would it affect the immates? My father is being held there.

Post a comment

Loading




Visiting an Inmate in the San Diego County Central Jail in California

Visiting a loved one is often encouraged by a correctional facility to keep the bonds of family, friendship, and love intact during a period of incarceration. Visitations usually give an inmate something to look forward to while they're locked up, and it's a nice change of routine given the everyday monotony and hardship of life behind bars. As much as visiting inmates is encouraged by the San Diego County Jail, there are rules and restrictions, as jail is a place for rehabilitation and punishment. Obtaining permission to visit an inmate may be difficult, but it's certainly not impossible.

In order to reserve a visit with an inmate, there is an online reservation portal available 24 hours a day from Tuesday through Sunday (not available on Mondays).

Telephone reservations will only be accepted from 10 AM – 2 PM Tuesday through Sunday, since the online reservation system has been a tremendous success since its implementation in 2012.

Once you have secured your reservation to visit the inmate, you need a valid ID in order to get in. A driver's license will do, as will any state, local or federal issued ID card, military ID, passport, U.S. Immigration identification (this does include visas), Border crossing card issued by the United States Department of Justice, valid high school ID card (for children who don't have a license or a state-issued ID), and a Matricula Consular ID card issued after April 22, 2002. The latter has to be issued by the Consul General of Mexico.

A maximum of three visitors is allowed at a time to visit an inmate, and minors must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian.

Inmates are allowed one visit per day, and two visits per week. Visits are generally non-contact, with the exception of the East Mesa and Facility 8 facilities, and visits are conducted through a window with telephone handsets.

Every one of the seven facilities in the San Diego County Jail system has its own rules and visiting hours, so be sure to check with the station for their policies.  Also, you should be punctual when visiting an inmate, because a reservation could be cancelled if you are late for a visit.

Walk-in visits may be honored if there is enough space and as long as you check in one hour before your visit, but it is recommended if you make a reservation beforehand. This does not apply to the East Mesa & Detention 8 facilities.

For other rules and standards for a visit, refer to the San Diego Sheriff's Department website, located at http://www.sdsheriff.net/jailinfo/visiting.html. From there, you will get full information on what guidelines you should adhere to when visiting an inmate in custody. Visiting an inmate can be hard, knowing that they have to stay in there when you leave. It can also be intimidating because it is a visit to a penitentiary and not a lunch date. Yet visiting an inmate will definitely mean a lot to him or her, and it is very much healing during a rough period.

RELATED: San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Search

RELATED: San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Services


writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.

return to top

How to use the Inmate Search for San Diego County Central Jail in California

[Article_Ad_2]The city of San Diego is a beautiful oasis in the Southern California desert, with magnificent beaches, great weather, and a lot to do. However, with any major city, there is also crime. One of the many troubles with crime, no matter how big or small the crime is that there are families and loved ones involved. As with many jails and prisons across the country, the San Diego County Sheriff's Department has a website which lets a person search for an inmate currently in custody in a San Diego County jail. The San Diego County jails have 980 beds, and information is available for any inmate currently behind bars.

If you are experiencing the San Diego County Sheriff's Office for the first time, whether you need to look up a client, friend, or a loved one currently in custody, the process to look someone up is pretty simple. Be sure to enter this link into your web browser:

http://www.jailexchange.com/CountyJails/California/San_Diego/San_Diego_County_Central_Jail.aspx.

From there, it will prompt you to look up an inmate that is in the system.

To the left of your screen, you will find an orange heading that says “INMATE SEARCH,” and two lines below the heading, you will find a link that says “San Diego County Jail Inmate Search.”

From there, the link will take you to the search database. It asks to enter a last name and a first name.

For whatever reason if you spell an inmate's name wrong, or if you can't remember the correct spelling of an inmate's name, the last name requires only the first two letters, and the first name only requires the first letter. So for the sake of argument, let's say the inmate's name is John Doe. In the last name, you would type in “Doe,” and under the first name, you would type in “John.” Or if you want, you could type in “Do” in the last name, and “J” in the first name; the problem with that is that you would get every inmate with a first name that begins with the letter “J” and the last name that begins with “Do,” which could be troublesome or tedious if there happens to be a lot of inmates with that particular name combination.

Click the “lookup” tab when you are done typing the inmate's name. Before it gets to the search results, it takes you to a security screen. It has you type in five letters in a box to verify that you are a human accessing this website and not another computer. I'm sure you have seen this in other websites. It's easy so long as you can read.

From there, it will take you to the search results if your criterion fits. Click on the inmate of interest, and there is a profile on the inmate staying at a San Diego County jail. There are no mugshots of the inmate, but you will get a description of the inmate being processed. It lists the booking number, and all of the inmate's vital statistics, including name, date of birth, gender, ethnicity and physical features, such as height, weight, and hair and eye color. It also shows the housing information, which includes what city and facility the inmate is being held at. From there, it shows bail information, services available to the inmate (including visitation scheduling, commissary information, and even e-mailing the inmate) projected release date, arrest information, and the charges against the inmate.

These profiles don't tell the whole story on why your loved one may be in custody, but it gives you enough information to start with so it can potentially give you some peace of mind.

RELATED: San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Search

RELATED: San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Services


writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.

return to top

Communicating with an Inmate Housed at the San Diego County Central Jail in California

It's hard to be away from your loved one, especially when they are incarcerated for a prolonged period of time. Luckily, keeping in touch with an inmate is pretty easy. Just because someone is locked up doesn't mean that they are closed off entirely from the outside world. They can receive mail (both written and electronic), telephone calls and visits from friends, family and loved ones. The San Diego Sheriff's Department encourages this wholeheartedly, but it does have a set of rules and regulations as to keep a sense of order inside a penitentiary.

Getting in touch with an inmate by telephone is probably the most challenging, as inmates cannot receive incoming calls and messages under normal circumstances. If there is an emergency, you should call the unit where the inmate is being held and ask to speak to a supervisor. From there, the supervisor's discretion will determine if the inmate can come to the phone in such an event. During non-emergency situations, it is up to the inmate to contact you by phone.

When an inmate is booked, California law allows an inmate three free local calls: one for an attorney, one for a bail bond agency, and one personal call. After the booking process is complete, an inmate will be assigned to a housing area where phones are available for use and free of charge in a common area. Normally, an inmate has access to a phone several hours a day, but there are some circumstances where phone calls are not allowed. These circumstances are during meals, medication distributions, temporary lockdowns, and after night count, in which the phones are disabled for the remainder of the evening. Phones may also be disallowed depending on the behavior of an inmate.

Written correspondence is also encouraged by the Sheriff's Department as well. However, as of September 2012, the only thing you can send to an inmate regarding a letter is either a postcard or an email. Enveloped letters will be returned to you if you mail one to an inmate. Postcards also are inspected by the prison staff, so be careful on what you put on there. Postcards will be rejected by the penitentiary if the following infractions are visible:

  • If the postcard is altered with any additional wrapping or layering
  • If it contains marks by crayon, stickers (other than a US postage stamp), glitter, watercolors or any other markings not considered a writing tool
  • Cosmetics or perfumes, such as lip gloss or scents
  • Depictions of nudity or other inappropriate content
  • Depictions of or references to weapons, gang references, criminal activity, codes, or markings
  • Anything deemed threatening to the staff at the San Diego County Jail (inciting a riot, racism, security threats, etc.)

All postcards must be sent through the United States Postal Service or any commercial licensed mail carrier. Please refer to the San Diego Sheriff's County website for more information regarding certified mail or sending books and other things.

E-mailing an inmate is the most curious way to contact an inmate, as they are generally thought of not to have access to e-mail, which is true in many respects. However, at the San Diego County Jail, you can e-mail an inmate. Yet, there are a set of rules for e-mail as well.

The first and most obvious rule, being that an inmate cannot e-mail you back, and any returning correspondence from an inmate will be through letters or postcards. The e-mail has to be limited to one page, and up to two e-mails per day. Also, an inmate can only receive up to 10 e-mails a day, so your messages may not be received on the same day depending on the circumstances.

The e-mails may not contain pictures or any other attachments. When prompted for a return address, include the address you want to use for correspondence through regular mail. Also, e-mails cannot be used for solicitation or any other commercial-related purposes. For instructions on how to send an e-mail, please visit this site for more information please visit http://www.sdsheriff.net/emailaninmate.html.

As with phone calls, visits, e-mails and letters, all communication with an inmate is subject to inspection and monitoring, and privacy is not guaranteed, so be careful on what you have to say to an inmate. If you wish to keep in contact with a loved one while they're incarcerated, remember that it is a privilege that can be revoked at any time. Other than that, communicating with an inmate is nothing short of encouraged during a period of incarceration.

RELATED: San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Search

RELATED: San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Services


writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.

return to top

© 2014 Johnny Ex, Inc. All rights reserved.