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Prison Skills Applied After Release

Getting out of prison and starting over is not easy, but with a little creative thinking, you can use the abilities you learned while incarcerated into useful tools for life. Organization – Almost everyone who goes into prison comes out much more organized in all aspects of life. Whether it has to do with keeping […]

Parental Visitation: Know the keys to Helping Your Child Visit Their Parent in Jail

Children typically desire contact with their parents, even if a parent is incarcerated, so learn the ropes to keep the connection going: Keep it Simple Depending on the age of the child, you can explain without going into too much detail, why the parent is in jail. Preschool to elementary kids – Let them know […]

Caring for an Inmate, Even If You Can't Visit the Jail or Prison

Visits are a lifeline for most inmates, but if his jail is very far away, or there are other reasons that make it impossible for you to visit, there are other steps you can take to let him know he is not alone. Lots of mail: Even if you can't write a letter each day […]

4 Things to Avoid During An Arrest

Only an attorney should advise you of your individual arrest situation but in general, these four suggestions may help stabilize your situation. Don't try and argue your way out. In most cases, by the time the cuffs come out, there is no turning back. Arguing, negotiating, and continuing to try to avoid arrest will do […]

Bio-chemical treatment for Alcohol Addiction

One method of treatment for alcoholism is the bio-chemical method. While other recovery paths concentrate on powerlessness over addictions and the acceptance of a higher power, the bio-chemical treatment places importance on stabilizing the brain's chemistry. It has long been known that certain brain chemicals such as dopamine, serotonin and endorphins

Average Prison Sentence Per Offense

The one thing that is consistent about US prison sentences is their inconsistency. Each state sets its own rules to use for each criminal offense. The more serious crimes, called felonies, are typically given longer sentences, while less serious crimes, called misdemeanors have shorter sentences. Taking a life — A premeditated murder can result

Understanding Inmate Calling Plans

Most jails and prison contract with third party vendors to provide a way for inmates to call their friends and families. Some of those companies only have one choice, but many of them provide a few options when you open and fund the account. Understanding what the different choices are will help you make a […]

Inmate Care Packages and How They Work

If your inmate is incarcerated in a jail that offers a care package program, you can have some fun surprising your inmate from time to time with a box full of things that you've personally selected for him or her. The Basics Inmate care packages are boxes or bags that are pre-filled with items from […]

Getting a Felon's Voting Rights Restored in Massachusetts

Voting is one of the most fundamental rights given to American citizens, but that right can be lost if you're a convicted felon. It's up to the each state to decide their laws about restoring rights. The laws for Massachusetts include: If You're Charged If you've been charged with a crime, but have not yet […]

He is a Drug Addict, but he Keeps Passing Drug Tests – How?

The probation department has the ability to send a test off to be examined for tampering, but you don't have those same connections. Understanding how they can be cheated will help you test him more effectively. Related: How do America's drug courts work? The Houdini switch Drug users have this down to a science. Everyone […]

Helpful Workout Routines if you are in State or Federal Prison

Incarceration is scary. It doesn't matter how old or tough you are, fear is a natural response to being sent to prison. Not showing that fear is one of the most important things you can do to protect yourself while doing your time. Exercise is a perfect tool to alleviate fear. According to Harvard Health […]

What Happens When an Illegal Immigrant Commits a Crime?

If and undocumented immigrant is charged with committing a crime, there can be three different legal outcomes. 1. ICE Gets Involved The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) enter information about an arrested immigrant into a database that is monitored. This department has the authority to take custody of the immigrant, investigate his standing

How to Get Your Visitation Suspension Lifted

The hardest part of having your jail visits suspended indefinitely is not having any idea when or if you are going to be able to visit your inmate again. In most cases, visits are suspended due to the visitor violating visitation rules. There are things you can do to try and those visits reinstated. Get […]

Why and How Drugs Are Divided Into Different Classes and Levels

The class of drug is typically included in the criminal charge for possession, sale or use. For examples, the charge would read, "Possession of a Class I drug for resale," or "Possession of a Class II drug". How They're Classed While each agency determines which drugs fall into each schedule, class or level, they are […]

Can a Felon Possess a Gun In Illinois?

Illinois law allows certain convicted felons to own or possess guns. Federal law still makes it a crime, and in some cases the feds have pursued prosecution in states that allow it. Only an attorney should advise you on this matter but the basics of Illinois laws are as follows: Your rights can be restored […]

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The San Diego County Central Jail in San Diego, San Diego County, California, like all jails is a maximum security facility. Because the inmates in this jail range from low level offenders to those being held for violent crimes like robbery, rape and murder, the security level is as high as is it is in any maximum security state prison. Some of the security features in this facility include security cameras, electronic detection and reinforced fencing topped with razor wire. Correctional officers in San Diego County Central Jail are armed with mace and trained to use physical force to protect themselves and other inmates from violence.

The men, women and juveniles being held in the San Diego County Central Jail are either awaiting trial or have been sentenced in the San Diego County Court System already and been sentenced to a period of time of one year or less. When an inmate is sentenced to a year or more, they are admitted into the California Prison or Federal Prison System. Inmates in the San Diego County Central Jail are fed three meals a day totaling 2,500 calories, are allowed access to phones to contact friends and family members, are allowed at least one hour a day for exercise, have access to books, bathroom and shower facilities. The inmates are allowed mail to be delivered to them as well as newspapers and magazine from trusted outside publishers.

The other jail facilities in San Diego County, California are: Chula Vista City Jail, San Diego City Jail, San Diego County Detention Bureau, San Diego County Facility 8 Jail, San Diego County Jail - Bailey Detention Center, San Diego County Jail - East Mesa Re-Entry Facility, San Diego County Jail - Las Colinas Women's Detention Facility, San Diego County Jail - Vista Detention Facility, San Diego County South Bay Facility. In addition, San Diego County houses the following juvenile facilities: San Diego Co.-East Mesa Juvenile, San Diego County - Girls’ Rehabilitation Facility, San Diego County. - Juvenile Ranch Facility, San Diego County-Camp Barrett, San Diego County-Kearny Mesa.

On this page you will find direct links to specific information that friends and family members of inmates will find useful: San Diego County Inmate Search, Inmate Phone use, Visitation Rules and Schedules, Commissary Deposits and Information about the San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Mail Guidelines. In addition, you will find information on how to contact the facility, directions to the jail, San Diego County recent arrests, Most Wanted, outstanding Arrest Warrants and much more.



San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Search

SDCJ

San Diego County Jail

San Diego Central Jail - Downtown

STATE COUNTY BEDS
California San Diego 980
 

How Does a Bail Bond Process Work?

Many states allow defendants to be released from jail to wait for court by paying a percentage of the total bond amount. Percentages range from 10 to 20 percent depending on state law. Understand how the process works to help someone who's been arrested. What is a Bond? A bond is an amount of money […]

Getting a Felon's Voting Rights Restored in Illinois

Voting is one of the most fundamental rights given to American citizens, however, once convicted of a felony, whether or not that right will be restored to you is up to the state that you reside in. The laws for Illinois include: If You've Been Charged Until you are convicted of a felony and incarcerated […]

How to Send a Book to an Inmate

Almost all jails and prisons require that books be sent to inmates directly from the publisher or a reputable online vendor, such as Amazon.com or BarnesandNoble.com. This requirement actually makes it simpler for you because you can compare prices easily and avoid shopping trips away from home or work and packaging time. How to Order […]

He is a Drug Addict, but he Keeps Passing Drug Tests – How?

The probation department has the ability to send a test off to be examined for tampering, but you don't have those same connections. Understanding how they can be cheated will help you test him more effectively. Related: How do America's drug courts work? The Houdini switch Drug users have this down to a science. Everyone […]

What Happens if You Bond Someone Out and That Person Flees?

In the chaos of an arrest it is easy to get caught up in the moment and race to bail someone out of jail. Bonding someone out is not hard to do, but if that person doesn't show up in court when ordered to do so, your life could become very difficult. Be sure you […]

Getting a Felon's Voting Rights Restored in Michigan

Voting is one of the most fundamental rights given to American citizens, however, once convicted of a felony, whether or not that right will be restored to you is up to the state that you reside in. The laws for Michigan include: Pending Cases If you are charged with a crime, but have not yet […]

Maine Marijuana Laws: Decriminalized but Still Tricky

Decriminalizing Pot doesn't always mean it is completely legal. Here are some current guidelines. Possession Unlike several other states that chose an ounce as the cutoff for a civil penalty, Maine allows you to possess up to 2.5 ounces and still receive a civil ticket. The fine is a flat $600 regardless of the amount. […]

When 12-Step Programs Don't Work For You

The 12-Step program is not the only method used in rehabs to assist addicts in getting clean and living sober lifestyles. Some rehabs accomplish the same goals through the following means: Medication Medications are available to assist with addiction. For Opiate addicts, the medication blocks Opiate cravings and in some cases will cause you to […]

Why Doesn't An Addict Get Clean After Overdosing?

As told by an addict who overdosed and almost died twice before giving up drugs. How often did you get high before you overdosed? By the time I overdosed the first time, I was getting high on a daily basis. I no longer took drugs to enjoy a high. I took them to avoid being […]

How to Get Your Visitation Suspension Lifted

The hardest part of having your jail visits suspended indefinitely is not having any idea when or if you are going to be able to visit your inmate again. In most cases, visits are suspended due to the visitor violating visitation rules. There are things you can do to try and those visits reinstated. Get […]

Get a Special Visit If You Live Far From the Jail

The logistics of visiting an inmate who is incarcerated very far from where you live can be tricky. If the jail has very short visits or requires a specific visitation registration processes, it makes it even more difficult. Some jails make exceptions for those who must travel to visit the inmate. How Far is Far? […]

Coordinating Inmate Visitation To Minimize Conflicts

Most jails allow three to five visitors to see an inmate at the same time. Problems can come about when too many people want to be there simultaneously. Managing the visitation schedule will reduce stress and insure that your inmate gets to see everyone. Check Visitation Rules Some jails will allow people to split visits […]

Why The Male Model Doesn't Work for Women Inmates

This is content sponsored by Netflix (producers of Orange Is The New Black) for the New York Times. There are some interesting facts and a few videos worth watching if you are concerned with the incarceration of women and the related issues.   Women serving time in American prisons

Inmate Care Packages and How They Work

If your inmate is incarcerated in a jail that offers a care package program, you can have some fun surprising your inmate from time to time with a box full of things that you've personally selected for him or her. The Basics Inmate care packages are boxes or bags that are pre-filled with items from […]

Solitary Confinement for Teenagers is a Bad Idea. Here's What We Can Do About It.

Inhumane disciplinary isolation for incarcerated children is causing suicides and other harm. All who believe that teenagers deserve special attention at their time of need will be interested in the recommendations in this New York Times piece. Read about it here: End Solitary Confinement for Teenagers

Hundreds more 'Straight Up Answers'...

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Visiting an Inmate in the San Diego County Central Jail in California

Visiting a loved one is often encouraged by a correctional facility to keep the bonds of family, friendship, and love intact during a period of incarceration. Visitations usually give an inmate something to look forward to while they're locked up, and it's a nice change of routine given the everyday monotony and hardship of life behind bars. As much as visiting inmates is encouraged by the San Diego County Jail, there are rules and restrictions, as jail is a place for rehabilitation and punishment. Obtaining permission to visit an inmate may be difficult, but it's certainly not impossible.

In order to reserve a visit with an inmate, there is an online reservation portal available 24 hours a day from Tuesday through Sunday (not available on Mondays).

Telephone reservations will only be accepted from 10 AM – 2 PM Tuesday through Sunday, since the online reservation system has been a tremendous success since its implementation in 2012.

Once you have secured your reservation to visit the inmate, you need a valid ID in order to get in. A driver's license will do, as will any state, local or federal issued ID card, military ID, passport, U.S. Immigration identification (this does include visas), Border crossing card issued by the United States Department of Justice, valid high school ID card (for children who don't have a license or a state-issued ID), and a Matricula Consular ID card issued after April 22, 2002. The latter has to be issued by the Consul General of Mexico.

A maximum of three visitors is allowed at a time to visit an inmate, and minors must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian.

Inmates are allowed one visit per day, and two visits per week. Visits are generally non-contact, with the exception of the East Mesa and Facility 8 facilities, and visits are conducted through a window with telephone handsets.

Every one of the seven facilities in the San Diego County Jail system has its own rules and visiting hours, so be sure to check with the station for their policies.  Also, you should be punctual when visiting an inmate, because a reservation could be cancelled if you are late for a visit.

Walk-in visits may be honored if there is enough space and as long as you check in one hour before your visit, but it is recommended if you make a reservation beforehand. This does not apply to the East Mesa & Detention 8 facilities.

For other rules and standards for a visit, refer to the San Diego Sheriff's Department website, located at http://www.sdsheriff.net/jailinfo/visiting.html. From there, you will get full information on what guidelines you should adhere to when visiting an inmate in custody. Visiting an inmate can be hard, knowing that they have to stay in there when you leave. It can also be intimidating because it is a visit to a penitentiary and not a lunch date. Yet visiting an inmate will definitely mean a lot to him or her, and it is very much healing during a rough period.

RELATED: San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Search

RELATED: San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Services


writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.

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How to use the Inmate Search for San Diego County Central Jail in California

[Article_Ad_2]The city of San Diego is a beautiful oasis in the Southern California desert, with magnificent beaches, great weather, and a lot to do. However, with any major city, there is also crime. One of the many troubles with crime, no matter how big or small the crime is that there are families and loved ones involved. As with many jails and prisons across the country, the San Diego County Sheriff's Department has a website which lets a person search for an inmate currently in custody in a San Diego County jail. The San Diego County jails have 980 beds, and information is available for any inmate currently behind bars.

If you are experiencing the San Diego County Sheriff's Office for the first time, whether you need to look up a client, friend, or a loved one currently in custody, the process to look someone up is pretty simple. Be sure to enter this link into your web browser:

http://www.jailexchange.com/CountyJails/California/San_Diego/San_Diego_County_Central_Jail.aspx.

From there, it will prompt you to look up an inmate that is in the system.

To the left of your screen, you will find an orange heading that says “INMATE SEARCH,” and two lines below the heading, you will find a link that says “San Diego County Jail Inmate Search.”

From there, the link will take you to the search database. It asks to enter a last name and a first name.

For whatever reason if you spell an inmate's name wrong, or if you can't remember the correct spelling of an inmate's name, the last name requires only the first two letters, and the first name only requires the first letter. So for the sake of argument, let's say the inmate's name is John Doe. In the last name, you would type in “Doe,” and under the first name, you would type in “John.” Or if you want, you could type in “Do” in the last name, and “J” in the first name; the problem with that is that you would get every inmate with a first name that begins with the letter “J” and the last name that begins with “Do,” which could be troublesome or tedious if there happens to be a lot of inmates with that particular name combination.

Click the “lookup” tab when you are done typing the inmate's name. Before it gets to the search results, it takes you to a security screen. It has you type in five letters in a box to verify that you are a human accessing this website and not another computer. I'm sure you have seen this in other websites. It's easy so long as you can read.

From there, it will take you to the search results if your criterion fits. Click on the inmate of interest, and there is a profile on the inmate staying at a San Diego County jail. There are no mugshots of the inmate, but you will get a description of the inmate being processed. It lists the booking number, and all of the inmate's vital statistics, including name, date of birth, gender, ethnicity and physical features, such as height, weight, and hair and eye color. It also shows the housing information, which includes what city and facility the inmate is being held at. From there, it shows bail information, services available to the inmate (including visitation scheduling, commissary information, and even e-mailing the inmate) projected release date, arrest information, and the charges against the inmate.

These profiles don't tell the whole story on why your loved one may be in custody, but it gives you enough information to start with so it can potentially give you some peace of mind.

RELATED: San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Search

RELATED: San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Services


writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.

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Communicating with an Inmate Housed at the San Diego County Central Jail in California

It's hard to be away from your loved one, especially when they are incarcerated for a prolonged period of time. Luckily, keeping in touch with an inmate is pretty easy. Just because someone is locked up doesn't mean that they are closed off entirely from the outside world. They can receive mail (both written and electronic), telephone calls and visits from friends, family and loved ones. The San Diego Sheriff's Department encourages this wholeheartedly, but it does have a set of rules and regulations as to keep a sense of order inside a penitentiary.

Getting in touch with an inmate by telephone is probably the most challenging, as inmates cannot receive incoming calls and messages under normal circumstances. If there is an emergency, you should call the unit where the inmate is being held and ask to speak to a supervisor. From there, the supervisor's discretion will determine if the inmate can come to the phone in such an event. During non-emergency situations, it is up to the inmate to contact you by phone.

When an inmate is booked, California law allows an inmate three free local calls: one for an attorney, one for a bail bond agency, and one personal call. After the booking process is complete, an inmate will be assigned to a housing area where phones are available for use and free of charge in a common area. Normally, an inmate has access to a phone several hours a day, but there are some circumstances where phone calls are not allowed. These circumstances are during meals, medication distributions, temporary lockdowns, and after night count, in which the phones are disabled for the remainder of the evening. Phones may also be disallowed depending on the behavior of an inmate.

Written correspondence is also encouraged by the Sheriff's Department as well. However, as of September 2012, the only thing you can send to an inmate regarding a letter is either a postcard or an email. Enveloped letters will be returned to you if you mail one to an inmate. Postcards also are inspected by the prison staff, so be careful on what you put on there. Postcards will be rejected by the penitentiary if the following infractions are visible:

  • If the postcard is altered with any additional wrapping or layering
  • If it contains marks by crayon, stickers (other than a US postage stamp), glitter, watercolors or any other markings not considered a writing tool
  • Cosmetics or perfumes, such as lip gloss or scents
  • Depictions of nudity or other inappropriate content
  • Depictions of or references to weapons, gang references, criminal activity, codes, or markings
  • Anything deemed threatening to the staff at the San Diego County Jail (inciting a riot, racism, security threats, etc.)

All postcards must be sent through the United States Postal Service or any commercial licensed mail carrier. Please refer to the San Diego Sheriff's County website for more information regarding certified mail or sending books and other things.

E-mailing an inmate is the most curious way to contact an inmate, as they are generally thought of not to have access to e-mail, which is true in many respects. However, at the San Diego County Jail, you can e-mail an inmate. Yet, there are a set of rules for e-mail as well.

The first and most obvious rule, being that an inmate cannot e-mail you back, and any returning correspondence from an inmate will be through letters or postcards. The e-mail has to be limited to one page, and up to two e-mails per day. Also, an inmate can only receive up to 10 e-mails a day, so your messages may not be received on the same day depending on the circumstances.

The e-mails may not contain pictures or any other attachments. When prompted for a return address, include the address you want to use for correspondence through regular mail. Also, e-mails cannot be used for solicitation or any other commercial-related purposes. For instructions on how to send an e-mail, please visit this site for more information please visit http://www.sdsheriff.net/emailaninmate.html.

As with phone calls, visits, e-mails and letters, all communication with an inmate is subject to inspection and monitoring, and privacy is not guaranteed, so be careful on what you have to say to an inmate. If you wish to keep in contact with a loved one while they're incarcerated, remember that it is a privilege that can be revoked at any time. Other than that, communicating with an inmate is nothing short of encouraged during a period of incarceration.

RELATED: San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Search

RELATED: San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Services


writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.

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