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With One Free Jail Call, Who Should I Reach Out To When I Get Arrested?

Anyone who has been incarcerated will tell you that once you are booked, given inmate attire, and assigned to a housing unit, your connection with the outside world is greatly reduced. During the booking process most jails will allow you one free phone call before taking you to your unit. Make it count. Very few […]

Dealing with a Drug Addict: How I Started Letting Go

If you are dealing with an addict in your life, you already know that you won't be able to keep it up forever. There will come a point where you will need to reclaim your life and get back among the living. Years ago, I began taking gradual steps toward letting go and by the […]

Can I Visit an Inmate if I am on Probation or Parole?

A friend or family member has been arrested and this has created chaos and stress. Before you race off to visit him or her in jail, if you are on probation or parole you need to take the following steps. Find out the Rules Some jails will not allow anyone on probation or parole to […]

Fun Ideas for Inmate Mail

Writing to your inmate is an invaluable way to communicate. You'll have your share of serious life issues letters, but here are some fun ways to entertain each other through letters. These can be done on postcards, too. Top 5 + 5 = 10 Each of you make a list of your favorite five things […]

Getting a Felon's Voting Rights Restored in Michigan

Voting is one of the most fundamental rights given to American citizens, however, once convicted of a felony, whether or not that right will be restored to you is up to the state that you reside in. The laws for Michigan include: Pending Cases If you are charged with a crime, but have not yet […]

Coordinating Inmate Visitation To Minimize Conflicts

Most jails allow three to five visitors to see an inmate at the same time. Problems can come about when too many people want to be there simultaneously. Managing the visitation schedule will reduce stress and insure that your inmate gets to see everyone. Check Visitation Rules Some jails will allow people to split visits […]

Consequences of Providing Contraband to an Inmate

It is never a good idea to mail contraband to an inmate or to bring it on a visit. The consequences for such actions are serious not only for the inmate, but also for you. What is Contraband? Contraband is anything that inmates are not allowed to have in their possession. Obvious examples are weapons, […]

Can a Felon Own a Gun In West Virginia?

West Virginia still requires you to receive a pardon from the governor's office before you can own/possess a gun in that state. Obtaining a pardon in West Virginia is very difficult. Over a recent period of nine different governors, only 131 pardons were granted out of all that applied. An attorney experienced in obtaining felony […]

Losing SSI and SSDI Benefits While Incarcerated

Your husband goes to jail and you figure his Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits will at least help with the bills even though he is not home to receive them. When the payments stop, there are four reasons why this may happen. Here are the four stages of the […]

Parents in Jail: Getting a Preschool-aged Child Ready to Visit

Preschool-aged children are very attached to their parents. If one of them is suddenly arrested and incarcerated it can cause lots of anxiety. Allowing the child to visit the parent can help alleviate those fears but it is important to explain what's coming with age-appropriate discussions. Talk it over immediately Waiting too long to explain […]

Parental Visitation: Know the keys to Helping Your Child Visit Their Parent in Jail

Children typically desire contact with their parents, even if a parent is incarcerated, so learn the ropes to keep the connection going: Keep it Simple Depending on the age of the child, you can explain without going into too much detail, why the parent is in jail. Preschool to elementary kids – Let them know […]

What Info Can I Get From An Inmate Search?

Nothing is scarier than a missing person. You're frantic to find out what happened. Then it hits you: Maybe your loved one got arrested. Many jails have websites that allow you to look up inmates currently in custody. Some even list those who were booked and recently released. But an inmate search can tell you […]

Massachusetts Marijuana Laws

Decriminalizing Marijuana doesn't always mean it is completely legal. In some cases, such as in Massachusetts, possession of less than an ounce is no longer a crime but is now a civil offense. Possession It is a civil offense to possess one ounce or less of Marijuana. If found guilty the fine is $100. In […]

When 12-Step Programs Don't Work For You

The 12-Step program is not the only method used in rehabs to assist addicts in getting clean and living sober lifestyles. Some rehabs accomplish the same goals through the following means: Medication Medications are available to assist with addiction. For Opiate addicts, the medication blocks Opiate cravings and in some cases will cause you to […]

Three Ways to Make Jail Calls Cheaper

Telephone calls are a lifeline between inmates and their families. Just hearing each other's voices helps ease the tension and anxiety surrounding incarceration. As nice as it is to get those calls, they can get expensive. The following three ideas can make the calls fit your budget better. Avoid Peak Hours for Collect Calls Many […]

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The San Diego County Central Jail in San Diego, San Diego County, California, like all jails is a maximum security facility. Because the inmates in this jail range from low level offenders to those being held for violent crimes like robbery, rape and murder, the security level is as high as is it is in any maximum security state prison. Some of the security features in this facility include security cameras, electronic detection and reinforced fencing topped with razor wire. Correctional officers in San Diego County Central Jail are armed with mace and trained to use physical force to protect themselves and other inmates from violence.

The men, women and juveniles being held in the San Diego County Central Jail are either awaiting trial or have been sentenced in the San Diego County Court System already and been sentenced to a period of time of one year or less. When an inmate is sentenced to a year or more, they are admitted into the California Prison or Federal Prison System. Inmates in the San Diego County Central Jail are fed three meals a day totaling 2,500 calories, are allowed access to phones to contact friends and family members, are allowed at least one hour a day for exercise, have access to books, bathroom and shower facilities. The inmates are allowed mail to be delivered to them as well as newspapers and magazine from trusted outside publishers.

The other jail facilities in San Diego County, California are: Chula Vista City Jail, San Diego City Jail, San Diego County Detention Bureau, San Diego County Facility 8 Jail, San Diego County Jail - Bailey Detention Center, San Diego County Jail - East Mesa Re-Entry Facility, San Diego County Jail - Las Colinas Women's Detention Facility, San Diego County Jail - Vista Detention Facility, San Diego County South Bay Facility. In addition, San Diego County houses the following juvenile facilities: San Diego Co.-East Mesa Juvenile, San Diego County - Girls’ Rehabilitation Facility, San Diego County. - Juvenile Ranch Facility, San Diego County-Camp Barrett, San Diego County-Kearny Mesa.

On this page you will find direct links to specific information that friends and family members of inmates will find useful: San Diego County Inmate Search, Inmate Phone use, Visitation Rules and Schedules, Commissary Deposits and Information about the San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Mail Guidelines. In addition, you will find information on how to contact the facility, directions to the jail, San Diego County recent arrests, Most Wanted, outstanding Arrest Warrants and much more.



San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Search

SDCJ

San Diego County Jail

San Diego Central Jail - Downtown

STATE COUNTY BEDS
California San Diego 980
 

Dealing with a Drug Addict: How I Started Letting Go

If you are dealing with an addict in your life, you already know that you won't be able to keep it up forever. There will come a point where you will need to reclaim your life and get back among the living. Years ago, I began taking gradual steps toward letting go and by the […]

Why Commissary is Important

Commissary funds are deposited to an inmate's account so he or she can purchase personal hygiene items, stationery supplies and snacks. Some lists also offer clothing, electronics, books and phone cards, among other things. A Relief from Hunger Inmates are typically fed two to three meals a day. The ingredients are high in calorie and […]

Parental Visitation: Know the keys to Helping Your Child Visit Their Parent in Jail

Children typically desire contact with their parents, even if a parent is incarcerated, so learn the ropes to keep the connection going: Keep it Simple Depending on the age of the child, you can explain without going into too much detail, why the parent is in jail. Preschool to elementary kids – Let them know […]

The Truth about Prison Phone Calls

Your inmate needs to stay connected to friends and family. While lots of information can be shared on the phone, precautions must be taken so that everyone involved can avoid having future problems. Phone Calls are Recorded If your inmate wants to discuss the case with you by phone, use extreme caution going forward. The […]

Finding Employment After Prison

Many companies will not interview a felon, much less hire one. While this is true and it can make life on the outside difficult, finding employment after prison can be done if you take the right steps. Career Centers Goodwill has set up a nationwide career center program to help underemployed and unemployed people and […]

Why The Male Model Doesn't Work for Women Inmates

This is content sponsored by Netflix (producers of Orange Is The New Black) for the New York Times. There are some interesting facts and a few videos worth watching if you are concerned with the incarceration of women and the related issues.   Women serving time in American prisons

5 Things Not to Talk About During Jail Calls

When he calls, it is a natural instinct to talk to him about what's going on in your life, but be careful. Never lie to him, but be smart about what topics you bring up to speak about. These 5 things should probably wait for an in person visit or for when he comes home. […]

Drug Addiction and Anger: Why Should I Do Anything for Him After All He Did?

When your boyfriend was doing drugs, there was chaos everywhere he went. Now that he completed rehab and is in recovery, he might need assistance with a few things to get started again. Putting your anger aside and helping him can provide the following benefits. Self-confidence: Whether he admits it or not, when he was […]

A Guide to Inmate Visitation Online

Jails across the nation are catching on to the popularity of offering remote, "at-home," visitation. Not only is it convenient for jail staff, inmates, and family members, but it is also a way for the jail to collect revenue because in most cases, at-home visitation is a paid service. How it Works To be able […]

Can a Felon Own a Gun In New Mexico?

Generally speaking, federal law makes it a crime for a convicted felon to own or possess a gun or ammunition. If you were convicted of a federal felony crime, you must receive a presidential pardon if you are to ever own a firearm again. Some states, however, have specifically designed laws regarding felons convicted of […]

Deciding How Much Money to Put on the Books

What does the inmate need? Contact the jail and ask what basics are supplied. Most jails give the inmates toothpaste, toothbrushes, shampoo, soap and toilet paper. Ask them what happens if the inmate runs out of something. is it replaced right away or do they have to wait a week or longer for new supplies […]

Can a Felon Possess a Gun In Illinois?

Illinois law allows certain convicted felons to own or possess guns. Federal law still makes it a crime, and in some cases the feds have pursued prosecution in states that allow it. Only an attorney should advise you on this matter but the basics of Illinois laws are as follows: Your rights can be restored […]

4 Good Places to Find Prison Pen Pals

Learn About Them Through friends. If you know someone who is incarcerated or has a family member incarcerated, ask for the name of an inmate who might like having a pen pal. This is an excellent way to meet pen pals because they can give a personal recommendation. Use Pen Pal Sites. There are several […]

He Expected Probation, Instead He Went to Jail.

My name is Jonathan. I thought I was going to get probation. Everyone I knew got probation for the same charge, but when I was called in front of the judge, he sentenced me to 30 days in jail. I was handcuffed, taken into custody in front of everyone in the courtroom, and brought to […]

Can a Felon Own a Gun In West Virginia?

West Virginia still requires you to receive a pardon from the governor's office before you can own/possess a gun in that state. Obtaining a pardon in West Virginia is very difficult. Over a recent period of nine different governors, only 131 pardons were granted out of all that applied. An attorney experienced in obtaining felony […]

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Visiting an Inmate in the San Diego County Central Jail in California

Visiting a loved one is often encouraged by a correctional facility to keep the bonds of family, friendship, and love intact during a period of incarceration. Visitations usually give an inmate something to look forward to while they're locked up, and it's a nice change of routine given the everyday monotony and hardship of life behind bars. As much as visiting inmates is encouraged by the San Diego County Jail, there are rules and restrictions, as jail is a place for rehabilitation and punishment. Obtaining permission to visit an inmate may be difficult, but it's certainly not impossible.

In order to reserve a visit with an inmate, there is an online reservation portal available 24 hours a day from Tuesday through Sunday (not available on Mondays).

Telephone reservations will only be accepted from 10 AM – 2 PM Tuesday through Sunday, since the online reservation system has been a tremendous success since its implementation in 2012.

Once you have secured your reservation to visit the inmate, you need a valid ID in order to get in. A driver's license will do, as will any state, local or federal issued ID card, military ID, passport, U.S. Immigration identification (this does include visas), Border crossing card issued by the United States Department of Justice, valid high school ID card (for children who don't have a license or a state-issued ID), and a Matricula Consular ID card issued after April 22, 2002. The latter has to be issued by the Consul General of Mexico.

A maximum of three visitors is allowed at a time to visit an inmate, and minors must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian.

Inmates are allowed one visit per day, and two visits per week. Visits are generally non-contact, with the exception of the East Mesa and Facility 8 facilities, and visits are conducted through a window with telephone handsets.

Every one of the seven facilities in the San Diego County Jail system has its own rules and visiting hours, so be sure to check with the station for their policies.  Also, you should be punctual when visiting an inmate, because a reservation could be cancelled if you are late for a visit.

Walk-in visits may be honored if there is enough space and as long as you check in one hour before your visit, but it is recommended if you make a reservation beforehand. This does not apply to the East Mesa & Detention 8 facilities.

For other rules and standards for a visit, refer to the San Diego Sheriff's Department website, located at http://www.sdsheriff.net/jailinfo/visiting.html. From there, you will get full information on what guidelines you should adhere to when visiting an inmate in custody. Visiting an inmate can be hard, knowing that they have to stay in there when you leave. It can also be intimidating because it is a visit to a penitentiary and not a lunch date. Yet visiting an inmate will definitely mean a lot to him or her, and it is very much healing during a rough period.

RELATED: San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Search

RELATED: San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Services


writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.

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How to use the Inmate Search for San Diego County Central Jail in California

[Article_Ad_2]The city of San Diego is a beautiful oasis in the Southern California desert, with magnificent beaches, great weather, and a lot to do. However, with any major city, there is also crime. One of the many troubles with crime, no matter how big or small the crime is that there are families and loved ones involved. As with many jails and prisons across the country, the San Diego County Sheriff's Department has a website which lets a person search for an inmate currently in custody in a San Diego County jail. The San Diego County jails have 980 beds, and information is available for any inmate currently behind bars.

If you are experiencing the San Diego County Sheriff's Office for the first time, whether you need to look up a client, friend, or a loved one currently in custody, the process to look someone up is pretty simple. Be sure to enter this link into your web browser:

http://www.jailexchange.com/CountyJails/California/San_Diego/San_Diego_County_Central_Jail.aspx.

From there, it will prompt you to look up an inmate that is in the system.

To the left of your screen, you will find an orange heading that says “INMATE SEARCH,” and two lines below the heading, you will find a link that says “San Diego County Jail Inmate Search.”

From there, the link will take you to the search database. It asks to enter a last name and a first name.

For whatever reason if you spell an inmate's name wrong, or if you can't remember the correct spelling of an inmate's name, the last name requires only the first two letters, and the first name only requires the first letter. So for the sake of argument, let's say the inmate's name is John Doe. In the last name, you would type in “Doe,” and under the first name, you would type in “John.” Or if you want, you could type in “Do” in the last name, and “J” in the first name; the problem with that is that you would get every inmate with a first name that begins with the letter “J” and the last name that begins with “Do,” which could be troublesome or tedious if there happens to be a lot of inmates with that particular name combination.

Click the “lookup” tab when you are done typing the inmate's name. Before it gets to the search results, it takes you to a security screen. It has you type in five letters in a box to verify that you are a human accessing this website and not another computer. I'm sure you have seen this in other websites. It's easy so long as you can read.

From there, it will take you to the search results if your criterion fits. Click on the inmate of interest, and there is a profile on the inmate staying at a San Diego County jail. There are no mugshots of the inmate, but you will get a description of the inmate being processed. It lists the booking number, and all of the inmate's vital statistics, including name, date of birth, gender, ethnicity and physical features, such as height, weight, and hair and eye color. It also shows the housing information, which includes what city and facility the inmate is being held at. From there, it shows bail information, services available to the inmate (including visitation scheduling, commissary information, and even e-mailing the inmate) projected release date, arrest information, and the charges against the inmate.

These profiles don't tell the whole story on why your loved one may be in custody, but it gives you enough information to start with so it can potentially give you some peace of mind.

RELATED: San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Search

RELATED: San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Services


writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.

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Communicating with an Inmate Housed at the San Diego County Central Jail in California

It's hard to be away from your loved one, especially when they are incarcerated for a prolonged period of time. Luckily, keeping in touch with an inmate is pretty easy. Just because someone is locked up doesn't mean that they are closed off entirely from the outside world. They can receive mail (both written and electronic), telephone calls and visits from friends, family and loved ones. The San Diego Sheriff's Department encourages this wholeheartedly, but it does have a set of rules and regulations as to keep a sense of order inside a penitentiary.

Getting in touch with an inmate by telephone is probably the most challenging, as inmates cannot receive incoming calls and messages under normal circumstances. If there is an emergency, you should call the unit where the inmate is being held and ask to speak to a supervisor. From there, the supervisor's discretion will determine if the inmate can come to the phone in such an event. During non-emergency situations, it is up to the inmate to contact you by phone.

When an inmate is booked, California law allows an inmate three free local calls: one for an attorney, one for a bail bond agency, and one personal call. After the booking process is complete, an inmate will be assigned to a housing area where phones are available for use and free of charge in a common area. Normally, an inmate has access to a phone several hours a day, but there are some circumstances where phone calls are not allowed. These circumstances are during meals, medication distributions, temporary lockdowns, and after night count, in which the phones are disabled for the remainder of the evening. Phones may also be disallowed depending on the behavior of an inmate.

Written correspondence is also encouraged by the Sheriff's Department as well. However, as of September 2012, the only thing you can send to an inmate regarding a letter is either a postcard or an email. Enveloped letters will be returned to you if you mail one to an inmate. Postcards also are inspected by the prison staff, so be careful on what you put on there. Postcards will be rejected by the penitentiary if the following infractions are visible:

  • If the postcard is altered with any additional wrapping or layering
  • If it contains marks by crayon, stickers (other than a US postage stamp), glitter, watercolors or any other markings not considered a writing tool
  • Cosmetics or perfumes, such as lip gloss or scents
  • Depictions of nudity or other inappropriate content
  • Depictions of or references to weapons, gang references, criminal activity, codes, or markings
  • Anything deemed threatening to the staff at the San Diego County Jail (inciting a riot, racism, security threats, etc.)

All postcards must be sent through the United States Postal Service or any commercial licensed mail carrier. Please refer to the San Diego Sheriff's County website for more information regarding certified mail or sending books and other things.

E-mailing an inmate is the most curious way to contact an inmate, as they are generally thought of not to have access to e-mail, which is true in many respects. However, at the San Diego County Jail, you can e-mail an inmate. Yet, there are a set of rules for e-mail as well.

The first and most obvious rule, being that an inmate cannot e-mail you back, and any returning correspondence from an inmate will be through letters or postcards. The e-mail has to be limited to one page, and up to two e-mails per day. Also, an inmate can only receive up to 10 e-mails a day, so your messages may not be received on the same day depending on the circumstances.

The e-mails may not contain pictures or any other attachments. When prompted for a return address, include the address you want to use for correspondence through regular mail. Also, e-mails cannot be used for solicitation or any other commercial-related purposes. For instructions on how to send an e-mail, please visit this site for more information please visit http://www.sdsheriff.net/emailaninmate.html.

As with phone calls, visits, e-mails and letters, all communication with an inmate is subject to inspection and monitoring, and privacy is not guaranteed, so be careful on what you have to say to an inmate. If you wish to keep in contact with a loved one while they're incarcerated, remember that it is a privilege that can be revoked at any time. Other than that, communicating with an inmate is nothing short of encouraged during a period of incarceration.

RELATED: San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Search

RELATED: San Diego County Central Jail Inmate Services


writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.

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