Five Reasons to Go to Drug Rehab and Stay Out of Jail

You know you have a problem, because lately your life has been falling apart. But going to rehab or seeking outpatient treatment seems like a drastic measure, because you’re still surviving. Think about getting help for these reasons:

  1. It shows your family you are serious. How many times have you promised to stop using drugs then gone out and gotten high again? Your family is worried that you, too, will end up in jail. Checking into a rehab lets them know you mean it this time and it might even get them to be more supportive of your attempts to turn things around.
  2. To keep your job. If you have been written up at work, you are already at the edge of being fired. Even if you haven’t formally gotten into trouble, chances are your co-workers and superiors suspect you have a drug problem. Many companies make it a policy to hold a job while the employee is in treatment. Yours might too. If not, it is still better to be on a new job sober than in your old job high.Video: Jon Jones busted for drug use
  3. To stay out of legal trouble. Very few active drug addicts avoid legal troubles over the long haul. As the saying goes, drugs always end in death, jail or sobriety. Why not choose sobriety before one of the other two happen? If you are already facing legal problems, completing rehab sends a positive message to the judge.
  4. To clear your head. By now, your drug use has probably become the main focus of your existence. Aren’t you exhausted? Rehab provides a break, gives you time to clear your head and decide what you really want out of life.
  5. To get clean. The ultimate reason to go into rehab is to finally kick the habit. Getting into recovery won’t be easy but it will be well worth it in the end.

How do drug courts work?

You will only get out of a rehab what you put into it but if you feel exhausted, are tired of hurting the people you love and are willing to at least hear what the counselors have to say, you have some good reasons for going.

 

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writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.