Inmate Visitation: They’ve taken my inmate’s visits away. Why would that happen?

It is very hard to get to the prison for a scheduled visit only to be told, they have taken his visits away. You will not be able to see him.  These are some of the reasons this can happen:

He got into trouble: They don’t typically stop visits for small things, but if it’s a greater infraction such as getting caught with a cell-phone, selling drugs, hitting a guard, or something equally as serious, he is probably in the hole and cannot see you for now.

What if I can’t visit an inmate as much as I’d like to?

He’s sick: Depending on the prison rules and the mood of whomever you are speaking with, they may or may not tell you that your loved one is ill and cannot have a visit. Visits will not be allowed if it’s a major illness or injury. Something minor, like a cold or sprained finger would not interfere with a visit.

Prison is riskiest for the sick.

He’s no longer there: This is a rare occurrence but it does happen. You spoke with him last night on the phone and told him you were coming today to see him, but between last night and today he was transported to another prison. They don’t typically tell prisoners ahead of time, so he would have no way of letting you know.

Sex offenders moving into one prison

There’s a mix up: This is another uncommon problem, but it does happen. Your guy is told he cannot have visits. You don’t get to see him and it turns out later that it was a mix up. His name landed on the no visit registry by accident. As frustrating as this is, they don’t make it up to you. They just let you see him the next time.

Final thoughts:  Before assuming the worst (he’s injured or was transported), know that many inmates end up in the hole at some point during their prison stay so that is most likely what happened. You will know by phone or letter soon and you can put your mind at ease.

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About Mark Miclette 682 Articles
writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.