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Louisville Community Correctional Center Inmate Search

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Jail Visits: Taking the Children With You to See Their Parent Inmate

If you want to take children to a jail visit, it is important that you plan ahead. Children's moods, ages and personalities all play a part in how successful the visit will be. Take these steps to ensure success. Your timing: If you have young children, take their nap times into consideration. Nothing is harder […]

Can a Felon Own a Gun In West Virginia?

West Virginia still requires you to receive a pardon from the governor's office before you can own/possess a gun in that state. Obtaining a pardon in West Virginia is very difficult. Over a recent period of nine different governors, only 131 pardons were granted out of all that applied. An attorney experienced in obtaining felony […]

Your Rights as a Pregnant Inmate

If you are incarcerated and pregnant, you need to be sure you notify the prison staff immediately. You will be given a pregnancy test to be sure you are expecting. If you are, some changes will be made to accommodate your condition. Each state has its own rules about the treatment of pregnant inmates, but […]

Massachusetts Marijuana Laws

Decriminalizing Marijuana doesn't always mean it is completely legal. In some cases, such as in Massachusetts, possession of less than an ounce is no longer a crime but is now a civil offense. Possession It is a civil offense to possess one ounce or less of Marijuana. If found guilty the fine is $100. In […]

How Does a Bail Bond Process Work?

Many states allow defendants to be released from jail to wait for court by paying a percentage of the total bond amount. Percentages range from 10 to 20 percent depending on state law. Understand how the process works to help someone who's been arrested. What is a Bond? A bond is an amount of money […]

Why Doesn't An Addict Get Clean After Overdosing?

As told by an addict who overdosed and almost died twice before giving up drugs. How often did you get high before you overdosed? By the time I overdosed the first time, I was getting high on a daily basis. I no longer took drugs to enjoy a high. I took them to avoid being […]

Why and How Drugs Are Divided Into Different Classes and Levels

The class of drug is typically included in the criminal charge for possession, sale or use. For examples, the charge would read, "Possession of a Class I drug for resale," or "Possession of a Class II drug". How They're Classed While each agency determines which drugs fall into each schedule, class or level, they are […]

The Three Most Dangerous Prisons in America

There are many factors that go into choosing the most dangerous prisons in the USA. The media spotlights isolated cases of prison violence, which makes that facility seem dangerous. The fact is there is danger in every prison, but some are more notorious for San Quentin State Prison: San Rafael, California There are more death […]

What are the Penalties for Probation Violations?

A probation violation conviction can mean being sent to jail or prison, but there are alternative penalties that can be used instead, including: Revocation and reinstatement: The judge and the probation officer can agree to revoke your probation for the violation and immediately reinstate you on new probation. Increased supervision: Your probation rules

Dealing With Allergies While Incarcerated

You are about to take the deal and it comes with jail or prison time. If you have allergies to food, plants, fabric or other environmental things, it is important that the administrators are made aware. Having an allergic reaction while incarcerated is different than on the outside. PODS and cells don't typically make it […]

What is an Inmate Money or Commissary Account?

Most jails and prisons in America allow friends and family members of inmates to make deposits to inmate money accounts. They are set up to give the inmate access to various services including commissary purchases and phone use. Some facilities deduct nominal amounts from these accounts for inmate health visits and other jail fees. Commissary […]

Getting a Felon's Voting Rights Restored in Massachusetts

Voting is one of the most fundamental rights given to American citizens, but that right can be lost if you're a convicted felon. It's up to the each state to decide their laws about restoring rights. The laws for Massachusetts include: If You're Charged If you've been charged with a crime, but have not yet […]

5 Ways to Help an Addict While he is Away at Rehab

Unless your friend is still living at home with parents and has no bills or responsibilities, he/she is going to need some help while at rehab. The five main reasons addicts worry about being gone are: Pets: If you are an animal lover, you might offer to take his pet in and take of him […]

Solitary Confinement for Teenagers is a Bad Idea. Here's What We Can Do About It.

Inhumane disciplinary isolation for incarcerated children is causing suicides and other harm. All who believe that teenagers deserve special attention at their time of need will be interested in the recommendations in this New York Times piece. Read about it here: End Solitary Confinement for Teenagers

Voting Rights for Felons in Alabama

The state of Alabama allows felons to have their voting rights restored under the following guidelines. You must have completed your entire sentence, including incarceration, probation, and parole, or community supervision. Once completed, you have three options: Contact your local parole or probation office Write to the Board of Pardons and Parole

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The Louisville Community Correctional Center in Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, like all jails is a maximum security facility. Because the inmates in this jail range from low level offenders to those being held for violent crimes like robbery, rape and murder, the security level is as high as is it is in any maximum security state prison. Some of the security features in this facility include security cameras, electronic detection and reinforced fencing topped with razor wire. Correctional officers in Louisville Community Correctional Center are armed with mace and trained to use physical force to protect themselves and other inmates from violence.

The men, women and juveniles being held in the Louisville Community Correctional Center are either awaiting trial or have been sentenced in the Jefferson County Court System already and been sentenced to a period of time of one year or less. When an inmate is sentenced to a year or more, they are admitted into the Kentucky Prison or Federal Prison System. Inmates in the Louisville Community Correctional Center are fed three meals a day totaling 2,500 calories, are allowed access to phones to contact friends and family members, are allowed at least one hour a day for exercise, have access to books, bathroom and shower facilities. The inmates are allowed mail to be delivered to them as well as newspapers and magazine from trusted outside publishers.

The other jail facilities in Jefferson County, Kentucky are: Louisville Metro Dept of Corrections, Louisville Metro Jail. In addition, Jefferson County houses the following juvenile facility: Louisville Metro Youth Detention Center.

On this page you will find direct links to specific information that friends and family members of inmates will find useful: Jefferson County Inmate Search, Inmate Phone use, Visitation Rules and Schedules, Commissary Deposits and Information about the Louisville Community Correctional Center Inmate Mail Guidelines. In addition, you will find information on how to contact the facility, directions to the jail, Jefferson County recent arrests, Most Wanted, outstanding Arrest Warrants and much more.



Louisville Community Correctional Center Inmate Search

Louisville Department of Corrections

STATE COUNTY BEDS
Kentucky Jefferson 400
PHYSICAL ADDRESS
316 East Chestnut Street
Louisville, KY 40202
FAX
502-574-2184
Prior to visiting an inmate, please obtain the inmate's CIN number by calling 1-800-511-1670 or obtaining it from the offender's booking information to the left (or below if you are using mobile).
 

Voting Rights for Felons in Alabama

The state of Alabama allows felons to have their voting rights restored under the following guidelines. You must have completed your entire sentence, including incarceration, probation, and parole, or community supervision. Once completed, you have three options: Contact your local parole or probation office Write to the Board of Pardons and Parole

Pregnant Inmates and Things They Should Do For Safety and Health

A pregnant inmate should take steps before going to jail to protect her pregnancy and the baby. There are several ways this can be done. From the first day, the jail needs to be aware the inmate is expecting. The jail will then perform its own pregnancy test to confirm the information. Ask about nutrition […]

Can a Felon Possess a Gun In Illinois?

Illinois law allows certain convicted felons to own or possess guns. Federal law still makes it a crime, and in some cases the feds have pursued prosecution in states that allow it. Only an attorney should advise you on this matter but the basics of Illinois laws are as follows: Your rights can be restored […]

Can a Felon Possess a Gun In Colorado?

Colorado law allows certain convicted felons to own or possess guns. Federal law still makes it a crime to do so, and in some cases the feds have pursued prosecution of those who possess guns in states that allow it. Only an attorney should advise you on this matter but the basics of Colorado's laws […]

The High Price of Jail Calls: Reducing the Cost of Long Distance Calls

If the jail where your inmate lives is far enough away that the calls from the jail are long distance, communication can become beyond your budget. Private companies provide services to jails for those calls by leasing telephone lines from Bell South or other phone companies and they pass the cost onto you while making […]

Inmate Voting Rights: Can I Vote After Being Convicted of a Misdemeanor Offense?

In most states, once you are released from jail for your misdemeanor conviction your voting rights are fully restored. In some cases, you are still allowed to vote even while incarcerated. In the states of Idaho, Kentucky, Indiana, South Carolina, Michigan, South Dakota and Missouri, if you are in jail or prison due to a […]

What Does a 15 Years to Life Sentence Mean?

A sentence of 15 years to life, 25 years to life or similar sounding words all mean the same thing. The only difference is the time frame. What the Number Means The number in the sentence indicates the minimum number of years the inmate must serve before he or she can be considered for parole. […]

Dealing With Allergies While Incarcerated

You are about to take the deal and it comes with jail or prison time. If you have allergies to food, plants, fabric or other environmental things, it is important that the administrators are made aware. Having an allergic reaction while incarcerated is different than on the outside. PODS and cells don't typically make it […]

Bio-chemical treatment for Alcohol Addiction

One method of treatment for alcoholism is the bio-chemical method. While other recovery paths concentrate on powerlessness over addictions and the acceptance of a higher power, the bio-chemical treatment places importance on stabilizing the brain's chemistry. It has long been known that certain brain chemicals such as dopamine, serotonin and endorphins

Your Rights as a Pregnant Inmate

If you are incarcerated and pregnant, you need to be sure you notify the prison staff immediately. You will be given a pregnancy test to be sure you are expecting. If you are, some changes will be made to accommodate your condition. Each state has its own rules about the treatment of pregnant inmates, but […]

Maine Marijuana Laws: Decriminalized but Still Tricky

Decriminalizing Pot doesn't always mean it is completely legal. Here are some current guidelines. Possession Unlike several other states that chose an ounce as the cutoff for a civil penalty, Maine allows you to possess up to 2.5 ounces and still receive a civil ticket. The fine is a flat $600 regardless of the amount. […]

Will They Let Me Drive an Inmate to the Doctor?

For the most part, any time a county jail inmate leaves a jail, official personnel transport him to medical appointments, but in some counties, depending on the circumstances, family members are allowed to provide the transportation. Each jail sets the rules. Here are some general guidelines: The severity of the crime comes into play. Obviously, […]

Fun Ideas to Mail to Your Inmate

Mail is a great way to communicate with your inmate. In addition to serious letters, here are some fun ways to amuse each other through the mail. These can be done on postcards or letters. Top 10 Each of you make a list of your favorite five things about the other person and also write […]

Why The Male Model Doesn't Work for Women Inmates

This is content sponsored by Netflix (producers of Orange Is The New Black) for the New York Times. There are some interesting facts and a few videos worth watching if you are concerned with the incarceration of women and the related issues.   Women serving time in American prisons

Cost Effective Ways to Visit an Inmate

The expenses of traveling to visit your inmate can add up quickly. These cost saving measures will make it less painful for your budget. Traveling by car Gas up early Gas up on a weekday. Many gas stations raise the price of a gallon shortly before the weekend. Filling up the tank on a weekday, […]

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Visiting an Inmate in the Louisville Community Correctional Center in Kentucky

As with telephone calls and letters, another great way to keep the lines of communication open between friends and family members during a period of incarceration is by visitations. The Louisville Community Correctional Center allows visitations seven days a week, but the schedules vary. The complete table of visitation times can be found here. However, this does not apply to those housed at the Louisville Community Correctional Center. All visits for that place are held on Wednesdays and Sundays only, and located on the south side of the jail, which is located at 316 East Chestnut Street. Depending on whether or not they are work-release inmates, the times of visitations vary slightly, and they are allowed one 20-minute visit per day.

Visitations are very much encouraged by the Corrections personnel in Louisville, but they are also obligated to impose rules on visitations as to keep a sense of order and balance. First and foremost, you need a valid ID to be able to visit if you are over the age of 16. All visits are conducted on a first come first served basis and they will adhere to the schedule as much as possible. Visits may be canceled by the Louisville Metro Department of Corrections due to failure to comply with visitation guidelines, or if they feel they have to at their discretion, so please behave yourself.

All visitors must arrive at least 30 minutes before the end of the visitation period, given space is available. As mentioned, inmates are allowed one visit per day for 20 minutes. Visits are limited to one adult OR one adult and one child under 18 or two adults per session. No exceptions. No wild parties, unfortunately. If you are visiting from out-of-town, you may have an extended visit of 40 minutes. However, you must be from at least 100 miles away from Louisville, KY. You also must provide a valid ID and proof that you are coming from far away. A piece of mail dating a maximum of one year, or a return plane or bus ticket will do. But bring both the ID and the proof that you are out-of-state. No one likes a wasted journey.

RELATED: Louisville Community Correctional Center Inmate Search

RELATED: Louisville Community Correctional Center Inmate Services


writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.

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How to use the Inmate Search for Louisville Community Correctional Center in Kentucky

[Article_Ad_2]The Louisville Community Correctional Center has 400 beds, and a revolving door of people who get locked up. Chances are you may have a family, friend, client, or loved one currently in custody. If someone you know has been arrested in the Louisville area, you can look them up through an online search database. Read below for instructions on how to look someone up.

First, you would have to log on to this website, and go to the "Jefferson County Inmate Search" link located on the left hand side of the screen. From there, you will be directed to a brief visual tutorial on how to look up an inmate. After that, go here and complete the search for your inmate.

After you search for your inmate, there will be a list of potential matches. Go to the profile of your choosing, and you will be directed to the inmate's profile. The profile is very brief and basic. It just has an inmate's name, ID number, date of birth, age, race, gender, custody status, and location. If the inmate has since been released, it will give a reason on why he or she is out of custody (i.e.: out on parole, etc). It does not give you an explanation on why an inmate is in custody, or how long a person is in for, or anything of that nature. It is just meant to verify that a person is currently in custody in the Louisville Community Correctional Center.

RELATED: Louisville Community Correctional Center Inmate Search

RELATED: Louisville Community Correctional Center Inmate Services


writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.

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Communicating with an Inmate Housed at the Louisville Community Correctional Center in Kentucky

Louisville is a beautiful city in the Commonwealth of Kentucky which has experienced a major boom in population in the last decade. No doubt, with this boom (due to a city-county merger), there are way more people to keep track of, and as a result, more crime. If you know someone who is currently incarcerated in the Louisville Community Correctional Center, contact with them is encouraged so long as both of you use common sense and don't cause a disruption. However, it may cost you a little bit. Read below on how.

The best way to contact an inmate is through the time-honored tradition of writing letters. Be sure to obtain the inmate's CIN # and whatever you do, do NOT send contraband items! Mail is inspected for such. The format for a letter is as follows:

Inmate's name, CIN #
Louisville Community Correctional Center
316 East Chestnut Street
Louisville, KY 40202

Inmates also have access to telephones in their respective dorms or dayrooms. They are provided solely for outgoing calls, and all calls made are considered collect calls. Here is the rundown on the calling rates:

  • Local: $1.85 – flat rate
  • Intralata: $1.73 plus $.23 / per additional minute
  • Interlata: $1.78 plus $.28 / per additional minute
  • Interstate: $3.95 plus $.89/per additional minute
  • Collect calls to cell phones: $9.99/per call

Please consider that these rates do not include any fees for collect calls charged by your phone provider, and that if you chose to accept a call from an inmate, these charges will show up on your bill. All calls are for 15 minutes, and after the 15 minutes are up, the call will be automatically disconnected. All calls are also monitored and recorded, so keep it cordial and clean! The number to call for an emergency is (502) 574-2120, but in general, inmates cannot accept incoming calls and messages.

RELATED: Louisville Community Correctional Center Inmate Search

RELATED: Louisville Community Correctional Center Inmate Services


writes about inmates, jails, prisons, courts and the lives of people who live and work within the United States Criminal Justice System. His mission can be summed up in a single word; transparency.

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