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How to Send a Book to an Inmate

Almost all jails and prisons require that books be sent to inmates directly from the publisher or a reputable online vendor, such as Amazon.com or BarnesandNoble.com. This requirement actually makes it simpler for you because you can compare prices easily and avoid shopping trips away from home or work and packaging time. How to Order […]

Can a Felon Possess a Gun In Georgia?

Georgia law is very clear on its position regarding convicted felons in that state owning or possessing firearms: It follows the federal law when it comes to guns and felons. The Basics: With the exception of a felony conviction that is non-violent and related exclusively to a business-related crime, if you have ever been convicted […]

How to Get Your Visitation Suspension Lifted

The hardest part of having your jail visits suspended indefinitely is not having any idea when or if you are going to be able to visit your inmate again. In most cases, visits are suspended due to the visitor violating visitation rules. There are things you can do to try and those visits reinstated. Get […]

4 Things to Tell Young Kids When Dad is In Jail

While your husband is incarcerated, your children will want to know what has happened. These four things can ease their mind without burdening them. Explain why he went. Without being specific about the exact crime he is accused of, you can tell the children that the judge thinks their dad broke the law and he […]

Can a Felon Own a Gun In New Mexico?

Generally speaking, federal law makes it a crime for a convicted felon to own or possess a gun or ammunition. If you were convicted of a federal felony crime, you must receive a presidential pardon if you are to ever own a firearm again. Some states, however, have specifically designed laws regarding felons convicted of […]

Visiting jail for the first time? Here's what to expect.

Visiting an inmate in jail for the first time is like waiting to see a dentist. The anticipation and worry constantly increases until you are there and you realize it was not as bad as you thought it would be. Knowing what to expect before that first jail visit will reduce your anxiety. Expect to […]

When Your Online Search Doesn't Find Your Inmate

Many jails have online databases listing those who have been arrested. In some cases, the database is updated every few minutes. If you do a search but nothing comes up, it doesn't necessarily mean your loved one is not incarcerated. There are several reasons an inmate can be in jail but not showing up in […]

Dealing with a Drug Addict: How I Started Letting Go

If you are dealing with an addict in your life, you already know that you won't be able to keep it up forever. There will come a point where you will need to reclaim your life and get back among the living. Years ago, I began taking gradual steps toward letting go and by the […]

Consequences of Introducing Contraband

It might be tempting to bring your inmate something from the outside, but doing so can have very serious consequences. If your inmate asks you to bring something illegal into the facility, he or she is not thinking clearly, therefore, it is up to you to be strong and not get the both of you […]

Five Fun Photo Ideas to Send Pictures to Your Inmate

Face it. You can only send so many selfies, family group shots or photos of the dog on the couch to your inmate before it becomes boring for both of you. Try these ideas to spice up the fun! Have a party for the inmate Gather friends and family together and have a party. Choose […]

Can a Felon Own a Gun Oklahoma?

Generally speaking, federal law makes it a crime for a convicted felon to own or possess a gun or ammunition. If you were convicted of a federal felony crime, you must receive a presidential pardon if you are to ever own a firearm again. Some states, however, have specifically designed laws regarding felons convicted of […]

Solitary Confinement for Teenagers is a Bad Idea. Here's What We Can Do About It.

Inhumane disciplinary isolation for incarcerated children is causing suicides and other harm. All who believe that teenagers deserve special attention at their time of need will be interested in the recommendations in this New York Times piece. Read about it here: End Solitary Confinement for Teenagers

Can a Deported Immigrant Get Back Into the U.S.?

Typically, once an immigrant is expelled from America, he is not allowed back into the country for any reason before a specific amount of time has passed, but in some instances he will be allowed to come back early if he successfully completes the Hardship Waiver process. What is a Hardship Waiver? A hardship waiver […]

Caring for an Inmate, Even If You Can't Visit the Jail or Prison

Visits are a lifeline for most inmates, but if his jail is very far away, or there are other reasons that make it impossible for you to visit, there are other steps you can take to let him know he is not alone. Lots of mail: Even if you can't write a letter each day […]

Getting a Felon's Voting Rights Restored in Louisiana

Voting is one of the most fundamental rights given to American citizens, however, once convicted of a felony, whether or not that right will be restored to you is up to the state that you reside in. The laws for Louisiana include: You've Been Charged You cannot vote in Louisiana if you are incarcerated for […]

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The Multnomah County Detention Center in Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon, like all jails is a maximum security facility. Because the inmates in this jail range from low level offenders to those being held for violent crimes like robbery, rape and murder, the security level is as high as is it is in any maximum security state prison. Some of the security features in this facility include security cameras, electronic detection and reinforced fencing topped with razor wire. Correctional officers in Multnomah County Detention Center are armed with mace and trained to use physical force to protect themselves and other inmates from violence.

The men, women and juveniles being held in the Multnomah County Detention Center are either awaiting trial or have been sentenced in the Multnomah County Court System already and been sentenced to a period of time of one year or less. When an inmate is sentenced to a year or more, they are admitted into the Oregon Prison or Federal Prison System. Inmates in the Multnomah County Detention Center are fed three meals a day totaling 2,500 calories, are allowed access to phones to contact friends and family members, are allowed at least one hour a day for exercise, have access to books, bathroom and shower facilities. The inmates are allowed mail to be delivered to them as well as newspapers and magazine from trusted outside publishers.

The other jail facilities in Multnomah County, Oregon are: Multnomah County Court Holding Facility, Multnomah County Inverness Jail, Multnomah County Jail - Wapato Facility (CLOSED). In addition, Multnomah County houses the following juvenile facility: Multnomah County Juvenile Detention Center.

On this page you will find direct links to specific information that friends and family members of inmates will find useful: Multnomah County Inmate Search, Inmate Phone use, Visitation Rules and Schedules, Commissary Deposits and Information about the Multnomah County Detention Center Inmate Mail Guidelines. In addition, you will find information on how to contact the facility, directions to the jail, Multnomah County recent arrests, Most Wanted, outstanding Arrest Warrants and much more.



Multnomah County Detention Center Inmate Search

Multnomah County Jail - The Justice Center

STATE COUNTY BEDS
Oregon Multnomah 676
PHYSICAL ADDRESS
1120 SW Third Ave.
Portland, OR 97204
INMATE MAIL
INMATE MAIL
Name Inmate was booked under, SWIS #
11540 NE Inverness Drive
Portland, OR 97220
FAX NUMBERS
Jail (Main): 503-988-4320


How to Bail someone out of Multnomah County Detention Center; both the Justice Center and Inverness:


Call the Jail Information line at 503-988-3689 to find out how much money you will need and forms of payment accepted. Bail can be posted only at the Justice Center Public Desk (downtown), and is accepted 24 hours a day, except between 6am - 7am2pm - 3pm, and 10pm - 11pm.
  

 

Fun Ideas to Mail to Your Inmate

Mail is a great way to communicate with your inmate. In addition to serious letters, here are some fun ways to amuse each other through the mail. These can be done on postcards or letters. Top 10 Each of you make a list of your favorite five things about the other person and also write […]

Getting a Felon's Voting Rights Restored in Massachusetts

Voting is one of the most fundamental rights given to American citizens, but that right can be lost if you're a convicted felon. It's up to the each state to decide their laws about restoring rights. The laws for Massachusetts include: If You're Charged If you've been charged with a crime, but have not yet […]

What Happens When an Illegal Immigrant Commits a Crime?

If and undocumented immigrant is charged with committing a crime, there can be three different legal outcomes. 1. ICE Gets Involved The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) enter information about an arrested immigrant into a database that is monitored. This department has the authority to take custody of the immigrant, investigate his standing

Finding Employment After Prison

Many companies will not interview a felon, much less hire one. While this is true and it can make life on the outside difficult, finding employment after prison can be done if you take the right steps. Career Centers Goodwill has set up a nationwide career center program to help underemployed and unemployed people and […]

Can a Deported Immigrant Get Back Into the U.S.?

Typically, once an immigrant is expelled from America, he is not allowed back into the country for any reason before a specific amount of time has passed, but in some instances he will be allowed to come back early if he successfully completes the Hardship Waiver process. What is a Hardship Waiver? A hardship waiver […]

5 Things Not to Talk About During Jail Calls

When he calls, it is a natural instinct to talk to him about what's going on in your life, but be careful. Never lie to him, but be smart about what topics you bring up to speak about. These 5 things should probably wait for an in person visit or for when he comes home. […]

4 Good Places to Find Prison Pen Pals

Learn About Them Through friends. If you know someone who is incarcerated or has a family member incarcerated, ask for the name of an inmate who might like having a pen pal. This is an excellent way to meet pen pals because they can give a personal recommendation. Use Pen Pal Sites. There are several […]

Best Days for Inmate Phone Calls

As much as you would like to talk to your inmate each day, the cost of inmate phone calls makes this impossible for most people. If your budget can only handle a couple of calls a week, tell your inmate to call you on Thursdays and Sundays. Thursday Thursday phone calls give you almost the […]

How to Survive Prison

Most people know the importance of working out and staying physically fit to survive prison, but mental strength and attitude play a huge role in getting through incarceration. Expand Your Skills If the prison offers classes, sign up for some. Whether it is music lessons, anger management or business math, anything you learn is something […]

What Does a 15 Years to Life Sentence Mean?

A sentence of 15 years to life, 25 years to life or similar sounding words all mean the same thing. The only difference is the time frame. What the Number Means The number in the sentence indicates the minimum number of years the inmate must serve before he or she can be considered for parole. […]

Losing SSI and SSDI Benefits While Incarcerated

Your husband goes to jail and you figure his Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits will at least help with the bills even though he is not home to receive them. When the payments stop, there are four reasons why this may happen. Here are the four stages of the […]

When Your Online Search Doesn't Find Your Inmate

Many jails have online databases listing those who have been arrested. In some cases, the database is updated every few minutes. If you do a search but nothing comes up, it doesn't necessarily mean your loved one is not incarcerated. There are several reasons an inmate can be in jail but not showing up in […]

Why Commissary is Important

Commissary funds are deposited to an inmate's account so he or she can purchase personal hygiene items, stationery supplies and snacks. Some lists also offer clothing, electronics, books and phone cards, among other things. A Relief from Hunger Inmates are typically fed two to three meals a day. The ingredients are high in calorie and […]

When 12-Step Programs Don't Work For You

The 12-Step program is not the only method used in rehabs to assist addicts in getting clean and living sober lifestyles. Some rehabs accomplish the same goals through the following means: Medication Medications are available to assist with addiction. For Opiate addicts, the medication blocks Opiate cravings and in some cases will cause you to […]

5 Steps to Mailing Commissary Money to a Federal Inmate

In addition to these five steps below, keep in mind that when you mail the commissary funds, they must go through the United States Postal Service. You cannot use Federal Express, United Parcel or other similar services. Step 1 Know where to send it. All federal commissary money must be sent to a central post […]

Hundreds more 'Straight Up Answers'...

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  1. A Former Inmate's Story - Part 2 Mon, May 07 2012 1:14 AM

    A FORMER INMATE'S STORY. PART 1. The Justice Center is the first stop for anyone arrested and booked in Portland Oregon - Multnomah County Jail. The booking process takes time, but the deputies who run intake are overall, fair and funny - but tough - and firmly in control even though you are unshackled and can sit, watch TV, go to the bathroom, etc. The first stop is a thorough search. Sometimes you then go to a holding cell if they are backed up, but often you will sit in a small group of chairs to watch TV and wait to get called to get your mugshot. From there, you move to a large, open room where you wait to see the nurse and do your formal intake. You will be asked if you are affiliated with a gang. You can manipulate the system to get fresher vegetarian meals claiming you are a practioner of the Muslim religion. Of course, if you do that you now have the attention of a federal agency that will want to 'look at your file'. After several hours and maybe a baloney sandwich, milk and cookie, you will be called, along with a group of others, to get your strip search, then your uniform and bedding. You are also given a free toiletry kit with something like shampoo, lotion a 3" tootbrush and toothpaste from China. The 2 piece uniform is a medium blue, pink t-shirt, pink underwear and pink socks. The brighter pink ones are newer. Noone gives a shit about the pink. The idea has lost it's edge. You are walked down a hallway to a large elevator and you ride up as a group to your respective floors and dorms. You are put in a 2-man cell, with painted concrete slabs as bunks, slit like windows giving you a clear view of downtown Portland. It's strange to see life going on with you locked in a jail. It can be both depressing and a great way to the pass the time. But that's all that is good with the Justice Center. From then on you are locked in a cell most of the day. You are only out for 2 hours a day (one hour at a time) to shower, get a book, make a phone call or work out. You eat in your cell. Your cellie might be a guy coming down from tweaking for months in a row and is in for possession, it could be a violent person, it could be a federal detainee involved in some high profile finance scheme... You never know for sure who you will end up, or how many different people will come and go in your cell. People come and go quickly at the Justice Center. Some get bailed out, most of the rest to Inverness, the better jail. Your wait can be a day or two or weeks. The more trouble you have given them in the past, the more fights, etc... the longer you wait. To read what happens as you leave for Inverness, skip over to the Inverness Page, by clicking the MORE JAILS IN THIS COUNTY (blue and red) icon right next to the address at the top of this page. ^^

  2. citizen Mon, Jun 10 2013 9:23 AM

    Not my experience. Jail staff is cruel uneducated low level govt employees. This is obviously written by a admin for pub relations purposes.

  3. No victims here Sat, Jun 22 2013 5:17 PM

    Cruel, uneducated, low level? Haha. You're the one that went to jail and lived to tell about it. Bitter, much?

  4. your moma Sun, Nov 17 2013 2:34 AM

    the jailers are no different than the beat pigs all you need is a high school diploma.and it shows,and they are better liars .all in all suck

  5. Kimmie Tue, Jan 07 2014 1:26 AM

    How long do they hold an inmates mail and what time is mail call ?

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